Designer Desire: Sara Tyson

Mosaic of Sara Tyson illustrations | H is for Home

We tend to feature vintage and mid-century modern artists and designers in our Designer Desire series. However, the work of Sara Tyson stopped me in my tracks. Tyson is an award-winning Canadian graphic designer and illustrator with over 30 years’ experience. Her work has graced the pages of periodicals such as Harvard Business Review, National Endowment for the Humanities, Smithsonian Magazine and The Washington Post.

She says she’s inspired by early Christian and Byzantine art and I think she has a similarity in style to one of my favourite artists, Stanley Spencer – especially Shipbuilding. A selection of her work is available to purchase from the i Spot website (link below). I’d really like copies of her ’12 Days of Christmas’ series of holiday greeting cards; they’re beautiful!

Sara Tysoncredit

Additional image credits:

Behance | Creative Finder | i Spot

Price Points: Homeware textiles with tassels

Homeware textiles with tassels | H is for Home

If you don’t have a massive budget and want to add some decorative touches to a room, a few tassels or pom-poms are a quick and easy solution.

There’s a huge variety of homewares that can be given the tassel treatment – curtains to cushions, bedspreads to beanbags.

Tassels can be pared back & natural or colourful & fun. They work with lots of different styles; from luxe to ethnic, modern to classical.

  1. Metallic key tassel – silver/gold: £2.49, Terry’s Fabrics
  2. Pocah multicoloured cotton cushion 45 x 45cm: £45.89 Maisons du Monde
  3. Selina table runner: £118.00, Anthropologie

Cakes & Bakes: Sourdough crumpets

Home-made sourdough crumpets | H is for Home #recipe #sourdough #SourdoughSeptember

I’m staying with the Sourdough September theme again this week with these sourdough crumpets. I hate wasting food and I despair at throwing away half of my sourdough starter each time it needs refreshing. To that end, I went in search of recipes that use this ‘discard’ and found this one for sourdough crumpets.

Sourdough crumpets batter | H is for Home

Crumpets aren’t my thing; I find the shop-bought ones rubbery and tasteless. To be honest, I only made these because Justin loves crumpets… slathered in butter, of course!

Cooking sourdough crumpets on a griddle | H is for Home

There’s been a set of metal rings in my baking station for ages, and I’ve not known quite what they were originally used for. This recipe called for ‘crumpet rings‘ – something I’d never heard of before. A quick internet search later – low and behold – I think that’s what my rings are!

If you don’t own crumpet rings, use cookie cutters – just make sure you oil them well before using. Also, if you don’t have a griddle (I used my pizza steel), a cast iron frying pan will do the job fine.

Freshly cooked, home-made sourdough crumpets | H is for Home

I don’t mean to boast, but these were miles better than any I’ve eaten before. Perhaps it was because I ate them straight off the griddle. They were lovely and soft and chewy without being rubbery – and the sourdough gave them a delicious depth of flavour. Crumpets have won me over!

Click here to save the recipe to Pinterest for later.

Sourdough crumpets
Yields 8
Cook Time
8 min
Cook Time
8 min
Ingredients
  1. 270g/9½oz sourdough starter
  2. 1tbsp runny honey
  3. ½tsp salt
  4. ½tsp bicarbonate of sodaHome-made sourdough crumpets ingredients
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Instructions
  1. Mix together the starter, honey and salt then allow the starter to start bubbling
  2. Rub your griddle and crumpet rings with a little vegetable oil, then place over a medium heat
  3. Stir in the bicarbonate of soda into the batter. It should start bubbling
  4. Once the rings are hot, pour the batter into them, leaving a ½cm gap at the top to allow for rising
  5. When the edges are cooked (about 5 minutes), remove the crumpets from the rings and flip them over and cook for a further 3 minutes. Repeat the process until all the remaining batter has been used up
Print
Adapted from Hobbs House Bakery
H is for Home Harbinger http://hisforhomeblog.com/

The ultimate guide to greener living

The ultimate guide to greener living

Not only does greener living directly impact the environment, when done correctly huge savings can be made to your annual household expenditure too. There are so many different ways you can incorporate greener living into your home, from having a water meter installed to discontinuing using plastic carrier bags. Here are a few pointers to get you on the road to greener living.

Daylight bulbs

Be energy efficient

The energy used to fuel our homes is not only one of the biggest household expenses – it’s one of our biggest contributions to climate change as individuals. Thankfully there are a few tricks to cut both, from simply turning down the thermostat by one degree to installing loft insulation which could knock up to £225 off your annual energy bill.

Turning off lights, taking appliances off standby and implementing timers will all help reduce monthly outgoings. Contact your energy provider and ask for a smart meter, which will allow you to check in near real time where your household is using the most energy and what it costs. It comes in particularly handy if you’re renting with friends and split the cost of your utility bills.

Dripping tap

Save water

With access to clean and safe drinking water literally on tap, it can be hard to identify with the need to actively try and save water. However, according to Water Wise the UK actually has less available water per person than most other European countries. Installing water efficient products will not only reduce outgoings, but you’ll be directly cutting down the energy used in treating and pumping waste – making a positive impact on the environment.

As toilet flushing, baths, showers and running taps are the biggest culprits in terms of water consumption, install a ‘hippo’ in the toilet cistern to save up to 3 litres of water with every flush. It’s also a good idea to fix dripping taps and fit showers and taps with aerated heads. Outdoors, a water butt is a welcome addition to any garden instead of a hose attached to the mains.

Cyclist on a racing bike

Leave the car at home

It can be so tempting to jump in the car and nip down to the local shops rather than brace the weather and endure a 10-minute walk. However, cutting down on unnecessary short journeys will not only greatly reduce your carbon footprint but will save you money on petrol and parking costs. What’s more, it’s a great way to sneak some exercise in to your daily routine.

When buying a new car, look for newer, more energy efficient models. While cutting your carbon emissions, they’ll also save you money on vehicle tax and petrol costs.

Basket of fresh vegetables

Grow your own

Whether you only have space for a few raised boxes or house your own vegetable patch at the bottom of the garden, growing your own food doesn’t have to be a daunting task. Hydroponic gardening is perfect for growing fruit and veg indoors with a quick turnaround. With practice, while you may still need to pick up supplies from the local supermarket, you’ll be one step closer to self-sufficiency.

What are your top tips for greener living?

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Get their look: Industrial style utility room

Industrial style utility roomcredit

For most people, doing the laundry is a chore at the best of times. However, I’d do my washing, drying and ironing with a smile on my face if this industrial style utility room belonged to me!

It’s practical, light and roomy – you could swing a duvet cover, never mind a cat. If you have the space, a separate and – in the case above – matching washing machine and dryer are especially handy… especially if there are lots of people (and therefore, dirty laundry) in the household. It can halve the time that wash day takes!

The monochrome décor is lifted with copper highlights in the pendant lights, worktop planters and beautiful laundry basket.

  1. Hanging ball glass terrariums with airplants
  2. Premier Jasper wide pendant light in copper
  3. Ampersand print poster
  4. Roger Lascelles 36cm French château wall clock
  5. Large copper wire basket
  6. Artificial cactus in metallic pot
  7. Miele WMH121WPS free-standing washing machine
  8. Miele TMG840WP tumble dryer

Get their look: Industrial style utility room | H is for Home

Designer Desire: Richard Koppe

Mosaic of Richard Koppe artwork | H is for Home

Richard Koppe (1916-1973) was an American modernist artist, designer and educator. In the late 1930s, Koppe attended the New Bauhaus in Chicago where he was taught by László Moholy-Nagy. You can really see the tutor’s influence on the pupil’s style.

For ages we’ve hankered after a menu he designed in 1948 for Well of the Sea restaurant located in the basement of Hotel Sherman, Chicago. Examples appear on eBay occasionally – but they are never cheap!

He produced other designs for the restaurant including 5 impressive ‘glow in the dark’ wall murals, coloured recessed back-lighting and kinetic mobiles. A range of crockery was produced for the restaurant by Shenango in 1953 using his designs. Someone on Zazzle is currently producing exact replicas of this restaurant-ware; putting it to china, melamine and textile home accessories.

We have an illustration painted by Cal Dunn of one of Koppe’s Well of the Sea murals in one of our vintage cookbooks, ‘The Ford Treasury of Favourite Recipes from Famous Eating Places‘. We’ve also found a couple of  contemporary black & white photographs of the restaurant here and here.

Richard Koppe exhibited widely at international institutions such as the Whitney Museum of American Art, the National Academy in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh, the Pennsylvania Academy in Philadelphia, the Royal Academy of Art in London, the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

He also taught for many years as Head of Visual Design and Fine Arts at the Institute of Design (ID) at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) and later as Professor of Art at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Portrait of Richard Koppecredit

Additional image credits:

Art in America magazine | Corbett vs Dempsey | Elmhurst Art Museum | Invaluable | Flickr