Get their look: Traditional yet modern living room

Traditional yet modern living roomcredit

This is a fairly traditional yet modern living room. It’s look is easily achievable as many of the fixtures and furnishings are available from the high street or retail park. A calm, neutral palette runs from one room to the next. Geometric patterned textiles provide interest and lift to the space.

  1. Large oval mirror
  2. Farrow&Ball Old White 4
  3. Brass and marble desk lamp
  4. Kensal console table by GillmoreSPACE
  5. Zinc: 4 seater sofa
  6. Zinc: pattern large footstool
  7. Zinc: pattern scatter cushion
  8. EKENÄSET armchair
  9. Cast Tec Verona carrara marble fire surround
  10. Cromwell small 16 inch solid fuel fire basket

Get their look: traditional yet modern living room | H is for Home

Designer Desire: Erik Bruun

Mosaic of Erik Bruun designs | H is for Home

Erik Bruun is a Finnish graphic designer probably best known outside of Finland for his Hartwall Jaffa orange drink ads and Finnair travel posters.

However, it is other designs altogether for which he is most famous in his home country. In 1986, he produced the designs for the current Finnish Markka banknotes. He also designed a 2011 Sampo Bank payment card in collaboration with the Finnish Association for Nature Conservation.

He went to the Central School of Industrial Design in Helsinki where some of his tutors included Kaj Franck and Tapio Wirkkala.

In an interview with Mr Wolf Magazine, he said he was given advice by the latter:

One should be passionate and inspired when starting a job. If you are not, then don’t start. Without passion, nothing exceptional is born.

You can purchase reprints of many of his vintage designs on his website.

Portrait of Erik Bruun

Here he is in a short film, putting the finishing touches on one of his Jaffa artworks…

Image credits:

Flickr | Pinterest

Price Points: Book bags

Book bags made to look like book covers

What’s your favourite book? Do you prefer fiction or non-fiction? Whatever your chosen reading may be, these book bags are perfect for toting it around… along with your keys, phone, purse, tissues, lipstick – whatever!

Back in the day, when I used to have a daily rail commute (and before mobile phones were so ubiquitous), I used to read books voraciously. I read Lord of the Rings entirely on the Todmorden ↔ Manchester train. I was also addicted to crime fiction, long before the advent of Scandi Noir.

Unfortunately, I never seem to find that kind of time any longer – more’s the pity. I think one of these book bags would certainly get me back into turning those pages!

  1. Book handbags and clutch bags by The Literary Gift Company: £30, Notonthehighstreet
  2. To Kill A Mockingbird leather book bag: from £143, Etsy
  3. Dolce & Gabbana book padlock top handle bag : £4,750, Harrods

Cakes & Bakes: Beetroot loaf

Home-made beetroot loaf | H is for Home

My Pinterest stream is always full of food photos – predominately cake, fudge, biscuits and bread. One in particular caught my eye last week… a beetroot loaf. The colour is amazing and I love beetroot anyway.

Grated beetroot, yeast mixture and mixing bowl of strong bread flour | H is for Home

I had a search through many of my cook books and finally found a beetroot loaf recipe in Bread. The recipe is designed for electric bread-makers (there’s a whole section of bread-maker recipes in the book if that’s your preferred way of making bread!) but it’s fine to use if you’re making it by hand.

Ball of beetrot loaf dough | H is for Home

Just mix the yeast and sugar in the water using a small measuring jug or cup, combine the flour and salt in a large mixing bowl making a well in the centre, pour in the yeast mixture and bring together roughly. Chuck in the beetroot, spring onions and butter (I omitted the last two ingredients) then knead well for about 10 minutes. Cover the mixing bowl in cling film (or put it inside a big clear [reusable] plastic bag like I do). Allow it to rise in a warm place until doubled in size. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl, punch down and put it into a loaf tin or well-floured banneton. Allow to double in size again before (transferring from the banneton to a greased oven tray) baking in a preheated oven at 220ºC/425ºF/Gas mark 7 for 30-40 minutes or until it sounds hollow when knocked on the base.

Home-made beetroot loaf with wooden handled bread knife | H is for Home

It was beautiful and absolutely delicious! Slightly sweet with a slightly earthy flavour. I had it with goats cheese and horseradish and Justin had the same in addition to a char-grilled sirloin steak.

Click here to pin the recipe for later!

Home-made beetroot loaf | H is for Home

Beetroot loaf
Yields 1
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SMALL
  1. 150ml/5fl oz/⅔ cup water
  2. 140g/5oz/1 cup grated raw beetroot
  3. 2 spring onions, chopped
  4. 375g/13oz/3¼ cups unbleached white bread flour
  5. 15g/½oz/1tbsp butter
  6. 1½tsp salt
  7. 1tsp granulated sugar
  8. 1tsp easy-blend (rapid-rise) dried yeast
MEDIUM
  1. 170ml/6fl oz/¾ cup water
  2. 225g/8oz/1½ cup grated raw beetroot
  3. 3 spring onions, chopped
  4. 500g/1lb 2oz/4½ cups unbleached white bread flour
  5. 25g/1oz/2tbsp butter
  6. 2tsp salt
  7. 1tsp granulated sugar
  8. 1tsp easy-blend (rapid-rise) dried yeast
LARGE
  1. 280ml/1ofl oz/1¼ cup water
  2. 280g/10oz/2 cups grated raw beetroot
  3. 4 spring onions, chopped
  4. 675g/1 ½lbs/6 cups unbleached white bread flour
  5. 40g/1½oz/3tbsp butter
  6. 2tsp salt
  7. 1½tsp granulated sugar
  8. 1½tsp easy-blend (rapid-rise) dried yeast
Instructions
  1. Pour the water into the bread pan. Sprinkle over the grated beetroot. If the instructions for your machine specify that the yeast is to be placed in the pan first, reverse the order in which you add the liquid mixture and dry ingredients
  2. Add the chopped spring onions. However, if your bread machine offers you the option of adding any extra ingredients during the kneading cycle, set the spring onions aside so that you may add them later on
  3. Sprinkle the flour over the beetroot and water, ensuring it covers them both. Add the butter, salt and sugar in separate corners. Make a small indent in the centre of the flour (but not down as far as the liquid) and add the yeast
  4. Set the bread machine to the basic/normal setting, medium crust. Press start. If you like, slash the top of the loaf with diagonal slashes just before the baking cycle starts
  5. Remove at the end of the baking cycle and turn out on to a wire rack
Notes
  1. If you prefer an all-over red loaf rather than speckled, purée the raw beetroot in a mini-food processor instead of grating it
Adapted from Bread
Adapted from Bread
H is for Home Harbinger http://hisforhomeblog.com/

Get their Look: Vintage industrial work-living space

Vintage industrial work-living spacecredit

This vintage industrial work-living space is the Moscow home of Ella and Nathan. The open plan space forms part of a converted sewing machine factory.

The light-filled apartment has a very practical and useful feature; a sliding screen door can be pulled across in front of the sofa, creating a bedroom in the space beyond – a very Japanese influence.

The fabric of the building provides an interesting backdrop. Muted background tones are lifted by pops of brighter colour such as book covers and fabulous yellow upholstery of a very comfortable looking reading chair.

  1. Ladderax shelving
  2. Industrial steel drum pendant light
  3. Mones dining chair by Oceans Apart
  4. Silver travertine honed tiles
  5. STRANDMON wing chair and footstool
  6. Rustic balustrade handmade dining table with paint effect base
  7. Vintage Navajo rug / Native American wall hanging – 1930s/40s

Get their Look: Vintage industrial work-living space | H is for Home

Designer Desire: Brian Wildsmith

Mosaic of Brian Wildsmith illustrations | H is for Home

As you may know, we’re massive fans of children’s book illustrations. We have vintage books in our collection by Miroslav Sasek, Bill Charmatz and Alain Grée amongst others. One illustrator we’ve admired for a long time, but don’t actually own any of his books, is Brian Wildsmith.

Wildsmith (who died in the summer of 2016) was an award-winning children’s book author and illustrator with a large portfolio of work behind him. His books were playful but educational at the same time and covered subjects such as ABCs, birds and other animals, fables and bible stories.

In an interview for the Independent newspaper in 2010, Brian Wildsmith explained his ethos:

[Before ABC] the text was the most important thing and pictures would just accompany it, diagrammatically explaining what was going on in the words. But I could limit my text so the illustrations explained what actually happened. And not just the physical event of what was happening, but the vision of the people or the animals or the landscape around them. I was expressing in colour the wonder and beauty of the world in which we live, which had never happened before, and would have been difficult to explain in words for children.

Some of his books are still in production, however, if you’re like us and prefer vintage copies – despite them sometimes being ‘read worn’ – there are always examples available on Etsy and eBay. We’re after a 1st edition of his Animal Gallery which teaches lots of the collective nouns like ‘a corps of giraffes’, ‘an array of hedgehogs’, ‘a herd of seahorses’ and ‘a troop of kangaroos’.

Portrait of Brian Wildsmith

Image credits:

Abe Books | Amazon | Hive