Who’s heard of dock pudding?

Breakfast plate of egg, bacon and dock pudding | H is for Home

Have you ever heard of dock pudding? I hadn’t until this year. It’s a pudding – if you can call it that – that’s very particular to our neck of the woods and this time of year.

Colanders of dock and nettle leaves | H is for Home

It’s a local, Calder Valley dish made of dock leaves, nettles, spring onions and oats – and is traditionally fried in bacon fat. The name ‘dock pudding’ is pretty misleading, not only is it not what you’d consider a pudding, it’s made using Persicaria bistorta. More commonly known as bistort, common bistort, European bistort, meadow bistort, gentle dock or passion dock.

Dock identification | H is for Home

It does however, grow alongside what we commonly know as dock – Rumex obtusifolius – or bitter dock, broad-leaved dock, bluntleaf dock, dock leaf or butter dock. Bistort is quite a bit smaller than dock. I’ve included a photo I took to help you identify the difference. If you’re still not sure about it, wait until June or July when bistort is in bloom. You can’t miss its pretty pink flowers shaped like cotton buds.

Adding oatmeal to dock pudding mixture | H is for Home

There’s a World Dock Pudding Championship founded in 1971 and held annually in Mytholmroyd. It took place just last weekend. During the Second World War, William Brooke Joyce, the last man to be hanged in Britain for treason, mistakenly believed that the people of Yorkshire were starving due to food rationing and were resorting to eating grass. In fact, they were simply enjoying their dock pudding!

Frying dock pudding rounds | H is for Home

I used the recipe from A Yorkshire Cookbook by Mary Hanson Moore and used a metal ring to mould them into perfect rounds. I had mine as a vegetarian option; served on a hash brown with runny egg sitting atop that. Justin had his served with the crispy bacon and egg – his dock pudding fried in bacon fat. We can honestly say that it was really delicious in both dishes. Justin had it again with a full English breakfast and says that in addition to the bacon and egg, it combines well with all other options like sausage, mushroom, tomato, potatoes, fried bread and toast. Dock pudding is a real winner – not only is it naturally foraged, very healthy and virtually cost free – the flavour really enhances dishes. As said, it’s great with breakfast ingredients, but could be used for all manner of other starter dishes and light lunches – or as a main course accompaniment.

Dock pudding
Ingredients
  1. 1 quart snakeweed leaves
  2. 1pint young nettle tops
  3. 4 spring onions, finely chopped
  4. 1 handful oatmeal
  5. small knob of butter
  6. bacon fatDock pudding ingredients
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Instructions
  1. Clean and remove the thick stalks from the docks and nettles and boil with the onions in a little water until tender
  2. Add some seasoning and sprinkle in the oatmeal
  3. Boil again for 10 minutes, stirring all the time
  4. Add the butter
  5. Leave overnight
  6. Next day, fry large spoonfuls of the mixture in hot bacon fat and serve with bacon
Notes
  1. Don't forget to wear protective gloves when picking the stinging nettles and make sure you forage in a place where dogs aren't able to cock their leg!
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Adapted from A Yorkshire Cookbook
H is for Home Harbinger http://hisforhomeblog.com/

Chalkware Japanese lady lamp

Vintage chalkware Japanese lady lamp | H is for Home

We picked up this lovely lady yesterday!

Vintage chalkware Japanese lady lamp | H is for Home

She’s a vintage 1950s Duron chalkware or plaster lamp… and the best example we’ve ever come across. Not only the design, but condition too – they’re often chipped and a bit tatty. The painted decoration is all original. It has twin bulb fittings and works perfectly.

Vintage chalkware Japanese lady lamp | H is for Home

We tend to steer away from what’s termed as ‘kitsch’, but the occasional example sometimes takes our fancy. We like the classic Tretchikoff girl prints… and this Japanese geisha has a similar vibe going on.

Vintage chalkware Japanese lady lamp | H is for Home

The lamp can either stand on a horizontal surface or can be hung on a wall.

Rear view of a vintage chalkware Japanese lady lamp | H is for Home

Here’s a view of the maker’s mark for collectors.

Vintage chalkware Japanese lady lamp | H is for Home

We’ll be a bit sorry to see her go actually, but go she must. The lamp is heading to our antiques centre space tomorrow. Sayonara lovely lady!

Get their look: Chilled home cinema

Chilled home cinemacredit

If we had a chilled home cinema like the one above, I don’t think you’d get us out of the house in the evenings – especially in the winter!

Long, slinky black sofas hugging the walls; bundles of squishy, comfy cushions; dark walls and low sloping ceiling all helping to give the ultimate cinema experience.

A home cinema is only as good as its AV equipment and it doesn’t get much better than a ceiling-mounted cinema projector and huge, electric drop down screen.

All that’s missing are the boxes of hot popcorn. Sweet or salted?

  1. Optoma HD142X long throw full HD home cinema projector
  2. Optoma DE-3120EGA Panoview 120 Inch 4:3 matt white electric drop down screen
  3. RCR Timeless whisky decanter
  4. Skull and crossbones cushion
  5. Vintage mirrored cocktail drinks tray
  6. Parsons concrete top/ stainless steel base 48×28 small rectangular coffee table
  7. Poliform ‘Dune’ modular sofa designed by Carlo Colombo

Get their look: Chilled home cinema | H is for Home

Orange vintage Siltal saucepan

Orange vintage Siltal saucepan | H is for Home

We picked up this very striking orange vintage saucepan during the week. It’s mid-century modern combined with ancient Egypt!

Vintage orange Siltal saucepan from above | H is for Home

The range was manufactured by Italian company, Siltal in the 1970s for food writer and chef Robert Carrier. He was a big name in the cookery world around this time – perhaps you remember him on TV. If not, you might very well have come across his vintage cookery books and recipe cards in charity shops.

Detail view of a vintage orange Siltal saucepan | H is for Home

Mid-century modern treatment of more ancient life or art can be very successful – Roman, Etruscan and medieval subjects spring to mind. Egyptian imagery is a new one to us.

Vintage orange Siltal saucepan with lid removed | H is for Home

This Siltal saucepan itself is beautifully made – quite reminiscent of Cathrineholm in materials and style. Siltal is still manufacturing products today, although they seem to concentrate on fridge-freezers and washing machines nowadays. So you’ll have to look out for vintage examples if you like the look. The pans were made in a variety of colourways – and there were also ancient Greek and Chinese ranges too. This large lidded example will be going into our antiques centre space priced at £45. It’s pretty heavy, but we could post out if required.

Designer Desire: Rosslyn Ruiz

Mosaic of Rosslyn Ruiz abstract artworks | H is for Home

A couple of weeks ago a fellow vintage dealer posted a photo on Instagram of an artwork they owned. Straight away I recognised the artist’s work – we also own one of her paintings. Her name is Rosslyn Ruiz… and it was the first time we learned of her full name.

Ruiz tended to sign her work merely ‘Rosslyn’ hence the reason we couldn’t find out anything about her before that fateful day. Ever since then, I’ve been on a quest to find out more about her and other examples of her work.

After quite a few Google searches, I stumbled upon a photo taken of the back of one of her paintings on which a label was stuck with the following inscription:

Rosslyn Ruiz was born in London in 1935. She is completely self-taught and began painting professionally in 1960 working with most recognised mediums and unconventional ones as well.

Her need to ‘create without rules’ has enabled her to explored and expand her techniques in texture and form. By combining holograms and collage with more traditional materials she creates contemporary paintings and has developed a unique style that demonstrates excitement and free spirit.

Rosslyn has had many successful exhibitions in Europe, America and Spain. She became well recognised in the 60s after her work was purchased by celebrities such as John Lennon, Jaqui Dupre, Thora Hird, Haley Mills, Jack Palance and Charles Bronson.

She appears to be still practising and is currently a member of Ely Art Society.

Additional image credits:

MyPlanet72

Price Points: Modular shelving

Modular shelving | H is for Home

We’ve finally managed to find a place for some vintage Ladderax modular shelving that we’ve had stored away for a few months. A very large, very heavy vintage industrial unit has been sold, freeing up a large space in our lounge. We’ve now got lots of more versatile storage space available – and somewhere for our vinyl collection and record player at long last. We’re big fans of Spotify combined with wireless Sonos speakers dotted about the house, but you can’t beat the tactile experience and warm sound of vinyl sometimes.

Number 2 in our list comes closest in appearance to Ladderax. It has a mid century modern feel – simple and pared back in style with a combination of black metal and wood – very pleasing to our eye. Number 1 has acres of shelf space and a couple of drawers to hide things away too – neutral in colour and a good budget option. And I’m completely in love with the multi-coloured Cubit system – the various size options and graduated colours provide endless possibilities.

  1. FJÄLKINGE shelving: from £10 for a shelf, (£290 for combination shown), IKEA
  2. Tower shelving system: from £65 for a shelf (£1,056 for combination shown), Heal’s
  3. Multi-coloured library shelving: from £24 for a CD shelf (£4,306.77 for combination shown), Cubit