Designer Desire: Rosslyn Ruiz

Mosaic of Rosslyn Ruiz abstract artworks | H is for Home

A couple of weeks ago a fellow vintage dealer posted a photo on Instagram of an artwork they owned. Straight away I recognised the artist’s work – we also own one of her paintings. Her name is Rosslyn Ruiz… and it was the first time we learned of her full name.

Ruiz tended to sign her work merely ‘Rosslyn’ hence the reason we couldn’t find out anything about her before that fateful day. Ever since then, I’ve been on a quest to find out more about her and other examples of her work.

After quite a few Google searches, I stumbled upon a photo taken of the back of one of her paintings on which a label was stuck with the following inscription:

Rosslyn Ruiz was born in London in 1935. She is completely self-taught and began painting professionally in 1960 working with most recognised mediums and unconventional ones as well.

Her need to ‘create without rules’ has enabled her to explored and expand her techniques in texture and form. By combining holograms and collage with more traditional materials she creates contemporary paintings and has developed a unique style that demonstrates excitement and free spirit.

Rosslyn has had many successful exhibitions in Europe, America and Spain. She became well recognised in the 60s after her work was purchased by celebrities such as John Lennon, Jaqui Dupre, Thora Hird, Haley Mills, Jack Palance and Charles Bronson.

She appears to be still practising and is currently a member of Ely Art Society.

Additional image credits:

MyPlanet72

Price Points: Modular shelving

Modular shelving | H is for Home

We’ve finally managed to find a place for some vintage Ladderax modular shelving that we’ve had stored away for a few months. A very large, very heavy vintage industrial unit has been sold, freeing up a large space in our lounge. We’ve now got lots of more versatile storage space available – and somewhere for our vinyl collection and record player at long last. We’re big fans of Spotify combined with wireless Sonos speakers dotted about the house, but you can’t beat the tactile experience and warm sound of vinyl sometimes.

Number 2 in our list comes closest in appearance to Ladderax. It has a mid century modern feel – simple and pared back in style with a combination of black metal and wood – very pleasing to our eye. Number 1 has acres of shelf space and a couple of drawers to hide things away too – neutral in colour and a good budget option. And I’m completely in love with the multi-coloured Cubit system – the various size options and graduated colours provide endless possibilities.

  1. FJÄLKINGE shelving: from £10 for a shelf, (£290 for combination shown), IKEA
  2. Tower shelving system: from £65 for a shelf (£1,056 for combination shown), Heal’s
  3. Multi-coloured library shelving: from £24 for a CD shelf (£4,306.77 for combination shown), Cubit

Cakes & Bakes: Triple chocolate chip cookies

Home-made triple chocolate chip cookies | H is for Home

Another week, another Cakes & Bakes chocolate recipe. But not just any old chocolate, but TRIPLE chocolate chip cookies!

Dry ingredients for triple chocolate chip cookies | H is for Home Two mixing bowls of ingredients for triple chocolate chip cookies | H is for Home

These are truly blow the diet, straight up delectable. Chock-full (see what I did there?) of dark and white chocolate chips, cocoa powder and sugar.

Adding dark & white chocolate chips to cookie dough mixture | H is for Home

If you’d prefer you can make tiddly little ones using teaspoons of cookie dough rather than dessertspoonfuls. That way, you’re only having a little morsel at a time. Me? I prefer my cookies soft, chewy and the size of frisbees!

Spooning triple chocolate chip cookie dough | H is for Home Balls of triple chocolate chip dough on lined baking tray | H is for Home

Justin tends to prefer savoury snacks to sweet ones, but even he’s contributing to the rapid disappearance of this particular batch.

Triple chocolate chip cookies cooling on a wire rack | H is for Home

Click here to pin the recipe on Pinterest for later!

Triple chocolate chip cookies
Yields 13
Cook Time
10 min
Cook Time
10 min
Ingredients
  1. 115g/4oz plain flour
  2. 1tsp baking powder
  3. 45g/1½oz cocoa powder
  4. pinch of salt
  5. 75g/3oz butter, softened
  6. 75g/3oz golden caster sugar
  7. 75g/3oz soft brown sugar
  8. 1 egg
  9. 1tsp vanilla extract
  10. 100g/3½oz dark chocolate chips
  11. 100g/3½oz white chocolate chipsHome-made triple chocolate chip cookies ingredients
Add ingredients to shopping list
If you don’t have Buy Me a Pie! app installed you’ll see the list with ingredients right after downloading it
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF/Gas mark 4
  2. Grease a baking sheet or line it with a parchment paper
  3. In a small mixing bowl sift together the flour, baking powder, cocoa powder and salt
  4. In another larger mixing bowl cream together the butter and sugar (using an electric mixer is best)
  5. Beat in the egg and vanilla extract
  6. Add the flour mixture and beat well on a low speed
  7. Using a wooden spoon, stir in 70g of the dark chocolate chips and 70g of the white chocolate chips
  8. Drop dessertspoonfuls of the cookie dough on to the prepared baking sheet and lightly press each with the back of a spoon. Space them 2½-5cm / 1-2 inches apart as they spread quite a bit in the cooking
  9. Dot the top of each cookie with 3 or so of the reserved dark & white chocolate chips pressing lightly into the dough
  10. Bake for 10-12 minutes
  11. Allow to cool on a wire rack while you make the next batch. Repeat until all the cookie dough has been used (My large baking tray took 3 batches to use up all of the dough)
  12. Store in an air-tight, lidded container for up to 3 days
Print
H is for Home Harbinger http://hisforhomeblog.com/

Get their look: Moody blue bedroom

Moody blue bedroomcredit

We’re still having a love affair with dark painted walls – and our own house has quite large expanses of these shades.

This moody blue bedroom looks like an amazing place in which to go to sleep and wake up.

The decor is quite eclectic. There are pieces of vintage mid century looking furniture such as the peacock chair and splayed leg bedside table; what looks like a lovely antique Persian rug; also, more contemporary textiles as seen in the gorgeous bedding, cushions and light shades. Along with the warm Scandi furs, these softer textures contrast beautifully with the industrial touches such as the cast iron radiator, distressed paintwork and bare bulb light fittings.

We think the room is very successful indeed – the matt, inky green blue makes the perfect backdrop for this wonderful mix of materials and brighter highlight shades.

  1. Uno basic 5 light cascade pendant by Bulb Attack
  2. Hand-printed Napoleon bee fabric
  3. Squirrel cage tungsten filament bulb
  4. Farrow & Ball ‘Hague Blue’ estate emulsion
  5. William Morris ACANTHUS cushion Aegean blue / off white
  6. Birdy side table
  7. Mid-century bedside table – acorn
  8. John Lewis Boutique Hotel silk cushion cover, natural
  9. John Lewis Boutique Hotel silk bedspread, natural
  10. Rattan peacock armchair by Out There Interiors
  11. Yolanda faded Persian Jacquard rug – 160 x 230 cm, petrol blue

Get their look: Moody blue bedroom | H is for Home

Designer Desire: Evelyn Ackerman

Mosaic of Evelyn Ackerman artworks | H is for Home

Alongside her husband Jerome, Evelyn Ackerman (1924-2012) was a leading light in California mid-century modernism. They were contemporaries of the likes of Alexander Girard and fellow married couple, Ray and Charles Eames.

She worked across a variety of mediums including mosaic, textile tapestry, metalwork and enamelware, stone casting and wood carving. They designed, produced and sold their work through their companies Jenev and ERA Industries.

Although mostly available in the United States (as expected), her work can occasionally be found on Etsy and eBay.

Jerome & Evelyn Ackerman in their homecredit

Hand-in-Hand book by Jerome and Evelyn Ackerman
Hand-in-Hand: Ceramics, mosaics, tapestries, wood carvings and hardware by the California Mid-Century designers

Image credits:

1st Dibs | Artnet | Invaluable

Price Points: Plum trees

Plum trees | H is for Home

A couple of weeks ago I noticed a bunch of saplings for sale outside the entrance to our local supermarket they were all priced up at £5.00 – bargain! I had a look at all the labels and amongst the apple, pear and cherry trees I spotted a single Victoria plum tree. I thought to myself that I’d return a bit later on in the day to buy it.

Needless to say, I popped back mere hours later and it was gone – I lost my chance! Anyway, a couple of days ago, I was back at the supermarket to pick up a couple of things and there were a couple of plum trees back in stock. I picked one out on my way in – I walked all around the shop with it – I wasn’t going to miss out again.

It said on the label that it’s self-pollinating (self-fertile), however, I did a bit of research online and apparently having other compatible plum trees nearby helps improve fruiting. ‘Compatible’ simply means another variety that flowers at the same time.

I’m torn between ‘Black Amber’ and the dual ‘Bleue de Belgique’/’Reine Claude d’Oullins’. The former only gets to 1 metre tall – perfect for a small garden like ours. However, the latter gives you two completely different varieties on a single tree; again, a good option for our limited space.

  1. Plum ‘Black Amber’ (mini fruit tree): £12.99, Van Meuwen
  2. Dual plum ‘Bleue de Belgique’ + ‘Reine Claude d’Oullins’: £17.50, Bakker
  3. Plum ‘Opal’: £24.99, Thompson Morgan