Etsy List: What a Corker!

May 25th, 2015

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'What a Corker!' Etsy List curated by H is for Home

Cork is considered by many to be a real 1970s material. It brings to mind orange & brown interiors sporting DIY-laid cork tiles – on floors, on ceilings on walls… but we love it.

Cork has had something of a renaissance of late; the range of products proving that it’s not just good for notice boards. It’s soft, warm, tactile, durable, waterproof and a sound dampener. What’s not to love?

Here are some of the best cork items we’ve discovered on Etsy… and no 70s naffness in sight!

What a Corker!
Curated by H is for Home

Pick of the Pads: So Last Century!

May 24th, 2015

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Mid century modern decorated sitting room

This fabulous house appeared in a recent edition of Stella Magazine

'So Last Century' article in Stella Magazine from 29 March 2015

It’s the Marseille home of Virginie & Jean-Baptiste Moutte, co-owners of vintage furniture store, Relax Factory.

Cover of Stella Magazine from 29 March 2015

As you’d expect from mid century modern dealers, their home is brimming with beautiful pieces from the era.

Armchair in a mid century modern decorated sitting room

We love their use of bright, primary colours which does indeed put you in a cheery, holiday kind of mood.

Kitchen in a mid century modern decorated sitting room

 It’s done supremely well – well judged and not at all gaudy.

Yellow bedroom in a mid century modern decorated sitting room

There are eye-catching feature walls, textiles & artwork – or, as in the case of the dining space below, bold chair covers to lift the more muted, natural tones of the room.

Dining table in a mid century modern decorated sitting room

With all the wonderful furniture, lighting and vintage accessories on view, the house could work as a staged shop display, but it manages to look very lived in and homely too – a little gem!

Charity Vintage: Pifco fan

May 23rd, 2015

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Vintage Pifco fan (ends 25 May, 2015 20:37:00 BST)

We know warm weather feels like a distant memory at the moment – but it’s the bank holiday weekend – summer must be on its way!

This gorgeous vintage 1950s Pifco fan would look the business on your office desk or craft room worktop. Keeping you cool while you work during those sweltering summer days! :-) It’s in full working order and is currently up for sale by Isabel Hospice*. It’s a mere £6.50 at the moment, with just over 2 days left to get a bid in if you fancy it.

*Isabel Hospice is a charity needing to raise nearly £4 million per annum to provide their free services to the people of eastern Hertfordshire. Their ethos is that they treat the whole person, not simply the illness. They offer a complete hospice service through their team of Community Nurse Specialists, a 16-bed, in-patient hospice, a day hospice, outreach day hospices, hospice at home and a family support and bereavement service.


Gimme Five! Metal potting stations

May 22nd, 2015

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selection of metal potting stations

Can’t you tell summer’s coming?! All the veg & salad seeds we sowed are sprouting. We’re running out of outdoor work space to prick out and pot on as seedlings outgrow their starter homes.

We’re after another potting station; one that can withstand living outside in damp northern climes. Aluminium or zinc will be best – with a lower shelf. You can never have too much storage space for seed trays!

We like #4 best, the one from B&Q. It has that all-important shelf, along with uprights along three sides which can be used as hanging space, acts as a windbreak for delicate seedlings and also prevents plants & tools from slipping off the edge from a height!

  1. Aluminium potting table: £36.50, Amazon
  2. Halls silver aluminium greenhouse potting bench: £55, Waltons
  3. Aluminium potting station: £69.99, Taylors Garden Buildings
  4. Potting bench: £30, B&Q
  5. Palram steel work bench: £44.99, Garden Street

Cakes & Bakes: Nettle loaf

May 21st, 2015

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home-made nettle loaf

Foraging season is upon us again. A fortnight ago I made a batch of wild garlic butter.

nettle loaf ingredients

This week, the stinging nettles are just right for picking. We had a patch in a corner of our allotment that was looking lush and healthy. It’s now had a little pruning session – and is the star ingredient in a nettle loaf.

basic bread dough

Don’t forget, if you’re going to try this recipe, take a pair of gloves and only pick the tips and first two leaves – much like tea-picking, I reckon!

nettle leaves lining a banneton

The nettles make for a rustic, flavoursome and attractive loaf.

bread dough proving and nettle leaves lining a banneton

I’ve used a basic white loaf recipe; but a half & half mixture of white and wholemeal will enhance the earthy, nutty flavour of the nettles. And nettles are SO good for you

kneading nettle leaves into dough wearing kitchen gloves

Pin this recipe for later!

Nettle loaf
Yields 1
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Cook Time
35 min
Cook Time
35 min
Ingredients
  1. 5g/⅙oz active dried yeast
  2. 300ml/10.5 fl oz warm water
  3. 500g/18oz plain flour
  4. 10g/⅓oz salt
  5. handful of nettle leaves
Instructions
  1. Add the yeast to the water and stir to remove any lumps. Add a teaspoon of sugar (optional) to help it along if the yeast is a bit old. Set aside for 15 minutes until it forms a foam
  2. In a colander, rinse & drain the nettle leaves removing any thick stalks. Set aside 4 or 5 of the leaves before roughly ripping the remainder
  3. Add the flour to a large mixing bowl and make a well in the middle
  4. Pour the yeast liquid into the well in the flour
  5. Bring the flour into the centre and combine
  6. Add the salt to the dough and knead to form a ball
  7. On a lightly floured work surface, knead the dough for 10-15 minutes
  8. Put the dough back into the bowl, cover with clingfilm and allow to rise in a warm place until doubled in size (about an hour)
  9. Lay the reserved nettle leaves, smooth side down, into a well-floured banneton if you have one. If not, lay them into a well-greased loaf tin
  10. Once proved, empty the dough out on to a lightly floured work surface and knead in the nettles (this is best done wearing a pair of clean rubber gloves)
  11. Form the dough into a ball and place into the banneton (or oblong if using a loaf tin)
  12. Put the banneton/loaf tin into the large mixing bowl and cover with clingfilm and leave to prove, again until doubled in size, in a warm place
  13. Preheat the oven to 240ºC/465ºF/Gas mark 9, put an empty roasting dish on the bottom shelf of the oven and fill a cup with cold water and set aside
  14. Once the loaf has risen, if using a banneton, grease a baking sheet and gently decant the loaf on to it, trying not to knock any air out of it
  15. Quickly & carefully pour the cup of water into the roasting dish before putting the loaf into the oven
  16. After 10 minutes, turn the oven down to 200ºC/ 400ºF/Gas mark 6
  17. Bake for a further 20-25 minutes before taking it out of the oven
  18. Leave to cool on a wire rack for at least half an hour before use
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