How to make the most of a small bathroom footprint

Ariel view of a small bathroomcredit

No matter what the shape and size of your home, youll always want it to be as stylish and comfortable as you can make it. When it comes to the bathroom, the three key things people look for are practicality, storage and luxury. Even if you’re dealing with a footprint that’s rather small, there’s no reason why you can’t achieve this by paying close attention to detail with your design features. Here are a few tips to get you started…

Start with the tiles

Campact bathroom with mushroom coloured tilescredit

As soon as you start to put colours and tiles on your walls, your bathroom can instantly appear larger or smaller. If you’re already dealing with a tight footprint, go for lighter, elongated tiles that give the appearance of a brighter and longer room. Try to stay away from pure white, as this can often be a little too dazzling.

Instead, light grey and ivory make good off-white colours which will still enhance any light that hits the walls. Consider adding a border tile too, which is again a slim, long design, so that the person entering the bathroom is instantly given the impression of more length.

Think about fixtures and fittings

Compact corner bathcredit

Next, it’s time to think about the bathroom furniture. If space-saving is your ultimate goal here, then you need to look at a variety of different designs and styles to find what you like. For example, a large, traditional roll-top bath would be completely impractical for a smaller bathroom, but you could get a corner bath with shower that has traditional features, so that you still have the look and feel you desire.

It’s best to check out an online retailer with a large choice, such as Better Bathrooms, to make these initial decisions. Then, consider additional items like floating toilets, where the cistern is concealed within the wall, so as not to take up precious floor space.

Start thinking vertically

Vertical shelving in a compact bathroomcredit

Now that you have your colours and fixtures all in place, in order to make this space usable, you’ll need to turn your attention to storage. Whether you have three children and their bath time toys to worry about, or you’re a leisure-lover with dozens of pampering products laying around, don’t think of your walls as dead space, and start using them more creatively. You can opt for the more conventional wall-to-ceiling units, or go for hanging compartments and shelving units that can be easily moved as your needs change.

Secondly, don’t be afraid to use every single nook and cranny in your space. You can easily have vanity units built to conceal pipes and such, but can you use that space for anything else? If you have an awkward recess in one wall, look for what tailored storage solutions there are around, so that you can turn it into something useful.

We hope this post gave you some inspiration – if you have any more ideas for small bathroom solutions, please let us know in the comment section.

[disclosure*]

Designer Desire: Tamara de Lempicka

Mosaic of Tamara de Lempicka artworks | H is for Home

Tamara de Lempicka has been a favourite artist of ours for years. Her work isn’t from our usual era – mid century modern – it’s straight out of the Art Deco and Jazz age.

de Lempicka’s work depicts her glamorous life and that of the time in which she lived. She came from a wealthy Polish family and lived a bohemian life, socialising with aristocrats and Hollywood film stars. She married a baron, had affairs with both men and women and travelled extensively, fleeing the Russian Revolution and then World War II.

Her painting style developed and changed throughout her career however, it’s her work from the 20s & 30s that’s our favourite. Portraits of fashionable flappers, open-topped sports cars, cubist skyscrapers. Her execution of  fabric – the folds, the ruffles, the shadows – is outstanding!

A range of affordable prints and other decorative objects using her artworks  can be found online. There are also lots of books about her paintings and her long and fascinating life.

Tamara de Lempicka painting a portrait of her first husband Tadeusz Lempicki, c.1928credit

Additional image credits:

Pinterest | Wikiart

Price Points: Old skool sneakers

Black old skool sneakers | H is for Home

My (only) pair of trainers are coming to the end of their life. I’ve had them for at least 15 years and the soles are worn down to the thickness of paper and the fabric is splitting across the vamp where the toe joints bend. They’re a pair of all-black Nikes and I’d like to replace them with something fairly similar.

I don’t like trainers that are too high-tech – you know, those made with colourful space-age material, aerodynamic shape, computer-engineered soles and all that. I just want a pair of old skool sneakers. ‘Sneakers’ must be an old fashioned word – my spell-check tells me it doesn’t exist!

I know exactly what I want from my new pair. I’d prefer if they were low-tech canvas or hemp. They need to be black all over, I don’t like black uppers with thick white sidewalls. This kind of style is so They can be worn with jeans, skirt or dress – really versatile.

I usually prefer the look of Pumas over other brands. However, I’m tempted by the £90 Nikes – they’re completely customisable. You can choose the material; the colour of the base, quarter, swoosh, laces, outsole and sidewalls; style of the tongue… you can even have customised text printed to the underside of the tongue!

  1. Old Skool Lite: £55, Vans
  2. Suede Classic+ trainers: £58, Puma
  3. Nike SB Zoom Stefan Janoski iD skateboarding shoe: £90, Nike

Cakes & Bakes: Bonnag

Sliced, home-made bonnag | H is for Home

A couple of weeks ago, we were watching an episode of Countryfile where they visited the Isle of Man.

Flour and cubes of cold butter in a mixing bowl | H is for Home

One of the features they did from there was the annual Bonnag World Championships – which, last year, was won by 11-year-old Tom Keig.

Bonnag dough | H is for Home

Bonnag is a traditional Manx bread which, it is believed, has been around for hundreds of years. It can be ‘plain’ as I’ve made here or can be sweet with the addition of dried fruit such as currants, raisins, candied peel and mixed spice.

Loaf of home-made bonnag | H is for Home

I went in search of a recipe but could only find ones with sketchy quantities and instructions. I guessed at the consistency and wetness of the dough. I thought it would be really similar to Irish soda bread in its ingredients and method. Anyway, it turned out really well. It was delicious straight from the oven with a smearing of butter!

Click here or on the image below to pin the recipe for later.

Manx bonnag recipe | H is for Home

Bonnag
The national bread of the Isle of Man
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
55 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
55 min
Ingredients
  1. 450g/16oz plain flour
  2. pinch salt
  3. 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  4. 1tsp cream of tartar
  5. 60g/2oz cold butter, cubed
  6. 250g buttermilkHome-made bonnag ingredients
Add ingredients to shopping list
If you don’t have Buy Me a Pie! app installed you’ll see the list with ingredients right after downloading it
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF/Gas mark 4
  2. Grease a baking tray and set aside
  3. In a large mixing bowl, sift together all the dry ingredients
  4. Rub in the cubed butter and make a well in the centre
  5. Pour in the buttermilk and mix until the dough just comes together
  6. Tip the dough on to a lightly floured work surface and form it into a ball. Do not over-knead
  7. Place the ball of dough on to the greased baking tray and bake for ¾ of an hour or until the top becomes golden brown
  8. Allow to cool on a wire rack
Print
H is for Home Harbinger http://hisforhomeblog.com/

Get their look: Elegant sitting room

Elegant sitting roomcredit

Get their look: Elegant sitting room | H is for Home

What is it that makes this space such an elegant sitting room?

The owners have retained the original 19th century features where possible, yet it looks thoroughly 21st century – bright, spacious and uncluttered.

The soaring ceilings with central rose and cornicing give the room grandeur. The wide, lime-washed Douglas fir floorboards elongate the space.

Then there’s the statement lighting – the oversized floor lamp and luxe ‘Bling’ chandelier have real impact.

The modern feel is further enhanced by pieces of mid century design furniture, contemporary artwork and textiles.

  1. Bling chandelier by Robert Abbey
  2. Farrow & Ball ‘Great White’
  3. HEKTAR white floor lamp
  4. Marble oval coffee table
  5. Raffles sofa
  6. Ercol Studio couch
  7. Douglas fir flooring

Designer Desire: Lotta Jansdotter

Mosaic of Lotta Jansdotter designs | H is for Home

We bought a lovely new duvet set a couple of weeks ago that was designed by Lotta Jansdotter. We’d not heard of her before but have since searched for and found lots of examples of her work online.

She’s a Finland-born, USA-based surface pattern designer whose products can be found on fabrics, bed linen, soft furnishings, luggage, ceramics, paper goods… all manner of homewares.

Her designs are bright and modern with a Scandi twist.

There are lots of different outlets selling her goods including Amara, B&Q, DaWanda, Etsy, eBay and Target. She has published a number of books on sewing, craft and decorating projects.

Alternatively, if you like getting hands on, Jansdotter runs workshops a few times a year in diverse locations such as Jaipur, Tokyo, Los Angeles and Åland (the islands where she is from originally).

Lotta Jansdotter portrait

Image credits:

Ashley Wilde Group | Pinterest