Designer Desire: George Cook

Mosaic of George Cook pottery items for Ambleside Pottery

Earlier this week, we wrote about a piece of Ambleside pottery we bought. Today we’re going to show you a few more examples of work by its maker, George Cook. Cook was the founder and main designer-maker of Ambleside Pottery based in the southern Lake District, Cumbria. He ran the pottery from 1948 until he retired in 1968, when he sold the premises to Brian Jackson. Between 1959 & 1966, he trained Gordon Fox who currently owns & runs Kentmere Pottery.

George Cook pieces regularly come up for sale at auctions across the UK and occasionally appear on eBay. They’re very reasonably priced… for the time being!

The 1954 Rydal Women’s Institute programme reveals how the group held their April meeting at George Cook’s studio. A pottery demonstration formed part of the event. The studio was located in North Road, in an abandoned corn mill (see bottom photo taken in April 1886) by Stock Ghyll, Ambleside.  The pottery remained in existence until the 1980s. At present, it operates as the Giggling Goose Café. Apparently, examples of the pottery can still be found on the roof above the kitchen window.

George Cook, founder of Ambleside Potterycredit

Stock Ghyll Mill, North Road, Amblesidecredit

Additional image credits: Worthpoint

You’re an angel

Vintage 1968 angel painting by Renate Doktor | H is for Home

This was an interesting recent buy. It’s a rather lovely painting of an angel. Archangel Michael or Gabriel perhaps? The wonderful colours and stylised nature of the piece really grabbed our attention.

Vintage 1968 angel painting by Renate Doktor | H is for Home

It was produced in 1968 by Renate Doktor – and there’s certainly something very distinctive about the treatment of the subject matter that puts it in this era. It’s painted on board – unframed, but mounted on a Hessian backing – again very common of the period.

Vintage 1968 angel painting by Renate Doktor showing signature | H is for Home

We think it’s very charming. If you’d like this particular angel to watch over you, just drop us a line. We’ve priced it up at £75.00.

Husman’s finds a home!

Vintage Husman's Potato Chips tin | H is for Home

We bought this extra large Husman’s potato chips tin at Thursday’s flea market. It’s made the long journey from Cincinnati, Ohio to Todmorden, West Yorkshire!

Vintage Husman's Potato Chips tin | H is for Home

The fabulous colours caught our eye from a long way off.

Potato Chip Institute seal on a vintage Husman's Potato Chip tin | H is for Home

As we got closer, we realised that it was a vintage tin with fabulous lettering and chirpy chip boy mascot! We reckon that it dates from the late 1960s era.

Cartoon image of a boy on a vintage Husman's Potato Chip tin | H is for Home

We love these branded wooden crates and tins. They’re very attractive and make for great up-cycled storage. And they also work really well as bedside or side tables.

Vintage Husman's Potato Chips tin being used as a side table | H is for Home

It’s perfect sitting alongside a favourite chair – a place for books, reading glasses, a vase of flowers, glass of wine or hot cuppa. We’ve become very fond of it in a short space of time. We don’t know how it got to our little Pennine town from Cincinatti, but we’re glad it did!

Designer Desire: Rosslyn Ruiz

Mosaic of Rosslyn Ruiz abstract artworks | H is for Home

A couple of weeks ago a fellow vintage dealer posted a photo on Instagram of an artwork they owned. Straight away I recognised the artist’s work – we also own one of her paintings. Her name is Rosslyn Ruiz… and it was the first time we learned of her full name.

Ruiz tended to sign her work merely ‘Rosslyn’ hence the reason we couldn’t find out anything about her before that fateful day. Ever since then, I’ve been on a quest to find out more about her and other examples of her work.

After quite a few Google searches, I stumbled upon a photo taken of the back of one of her paintings on which a label was stuck with the following inscription:

Rosslyn Ruiz was born in London in 1935. She is completely self-taught and began painting professionally in 1960 working with most recognised mediums and unconventional ones as well.

Her need to ‘create without rules’ has enabled her to explored and expand her techniques in texture and form. By combining holograms and collage with more traditional materials she creates contemporary paintings and has developed a unique style that demonstrates excitement and free spirit.

Rosslyn has had many successful exhibitions in Europe, America and Spain. She became well recognised in the 60s after her work was purchased by celebrities such as John Lennon, Jaqui Dupre, Thora Hird, Haley Mills, Jack Palance and Charles Bronson.

She appears to be still practising and is currently a member of Ely Art Society.

Additional image credits:

MyPlanet72

Win tickets to York’s Festival of Vintage

Win a pair of Festival of Vintage tickets | H is for Home

We’ve teamed up with the award-winning Festival of Vintage to offer two of our readers a pair of tickets each to attend the upcoming festival. This April 22nd & 23rd it returns for its 7th year to York Racecourse and will once again be showcasing the best in vintage shopping, music, dancing and fashion.

Vintage shelves for sale at the Festival of Vintage, York

A fun and nostalgic weekend, it attracts thousands of visitors, giving a feeling of being transported back in time. There’s a packed programme with three large halls of vintage shopping including fashion, homewares and furniture, two dance halls and music stages plus an impressive classic car display outside all focusing on the 1930s-1960s.

Rack of vintage clothes for sale at Festival of Vintage, York

There are so many extra things to see and do over the weekend such as craft ‘Make, Do and Mend’ workshops where you can learn a new skill, dance lessons covering many styles such as Lindy Hop and Jive and a variety of fashion shows. The Marks and Spencer Archive team returns to share their fashion history with everyone in Q&As and talks as well as show casing their favourite designs on the catwalk. There’s even a ‘Best Dressed’ contest where you can wow the judges and win cash prizes.

Couples dancing at the Festival of Vintage, York

With over 200 hand-picked vintage sellers from across the UK as well as 50 top quality vintage reproduction brands, the event is a honey pot for collectors and enthusiasts. Be it fashion, homewares, music, jewellery – there’ll be something there for everyone.

Vintage fabric for sale at the Festival of Vintage, York

Doors open from 10am-5pm, both days. York Racecourse, York YO23 1EX. For more information visit www.festivalofvintage.co.uk or call 0113 3458699.

If you fancy this as a great day or weekend out leave us a comment below saying what you’d most look forward to seeing or doing at the Festival of Vintage.

Tickets to Festival of Vintage, York





Shared on: Superluckyme | The Prizefinder | Loquax | U Me and the Kids

Blow up the world!

Vintage inflatable globe | H is for Home

This fabulous vintage inflatable globe has to be our favourite buy of the week.

Vintage inflatable globe with bent wood chair | H is for Home

It’s got such a wonderful mid century modern look. The colours are quite muted – it almost looks like opaque glass. And we also love the shape of the stand with its sweeping arcs. As you can see from the picture of it with a large chair, it’s an impressive size – about 50cm in diameter – and it’s got real impact when you walk into a room. It would look amazing in a pared back, minimalist space – perhaps alongside an Eames lounger or sitting on a Danish teak sideboard or desk.

Vintage Hammond's International World Globe booklet | H is for Home

Globes are full of clues to establish their age – country names, borders etc. This one dates from c. 1955. It still has its original accompanying instruction leaflet. It was manufactured by Hammonds of New York and retailed in the UK at a cost of 4 pounds 10 shillings – quite a sum back in the mid 1950s.

Detail of inflatable vintage Hammond's International World Globe showing the Arctic Circle

It’s very robust, but even has it’s own puncture repair kit just in case of damage. It’s survived 60 years without harm so we’re not expecting it to explode any time soon!