Designer Desire: John and Sylvia Reid

Mosaic of John and Sylvia Reid designs | H is for Home

This week, we feature a British, mid-century modern design duo – John and Sylvia Reid. Architects/designers who produced furniture for Stag Furniture and lighting for Rotaflex. They’ve also been involved in designs for the Boys Club, Stamford Hill, Hackney; Piazza Coffee Bar, Marylebone High Street, London and the Wheatsheaf Pub, Cumberland Road, Camberley.

The couple’s son, Dominic Reid, is reproducing some of the designs from their archive. He’s collaborated with Nicholas Radford, the Managing Director of Nathan Furniture (which is produced here in little old Todmorden!) and son of the original manufacturer. They’re reissuing a capsule collection from the S-Range which initially launched in 1960 and ended production a mere 3 years later.

The collection will be launched at Clerkenwell Design Week next month (22-24 May 2018). Said Radford:

Dominic and I are very excited about the re-issue of the S-Range, as it represents not only one of the very best examples of British mid-century design, but has a great collaborative heritage behind it which we are both very proud to be a part of. We hope the design community attending Clerkenwell will love what we have to show them.”

Portrait of John and Sylvia Reidcredit

Additional image credits:

1st Dibs | Artnet | Artsy | Pinterest

Designer Desire: Eva Hidström

Collage of Eva Hidström metalware and jewellery designs | H is for Home

There’s not a great deal of information on the internet about Eva Hidström – at least, not that I could find. She’s a 3rd generation Finnish metalware and jewellery designer based in Salo. She specialises in beautiful, colourful enamelware items.

She has produced work for Tillander, Suomalainen Koru and Kultakeskus Oy.

You can occasionally find examples of her work up for sale on Etsy and at specialist sales and auction houses such as T W Gaze, Auktionsverket and Bukowskis.

If you’d like to find out a little more about Hidström, there’s a more detailed feature with additional images by Jonas Forth who’s the CEO of Moomin.

Portrait of Eva Hidströmcredit

The very stylish Kobenstyle

Red vintage Kobenstyle casserole pan | H is for Home

We bought this gorgeous vintage chilli red enamel pan this week. It’s from the Kobenstyle range designed by Jens Quistgaard for Dansk Designs.

Collection of vintage homewares acquired this week | H is for Home

It was one object from a very colourful array picked up at a local flea market. We like them all, but the casserole has to be our favourite. We’ve always loved this design – it’s both practical and great to look at. The pans are hard-wearing and easy to manipulate & move around. The lid can also be turned upside down to act as a trivet for the hot pan. It’s an absolute kitchen classic!

Dansk Designs stamp to the bottom of a red vintage Kobenstyle casserole dish with lid | H is for Home

This particular stamp (‘four duck’ logo & ‘Denmark’) means that the pan was produced in Denmark somewhere between 1959 & 1965. Later pieces were produced in France and Japan. It was out of production for quite a while, but the range has been re-issued and is now produced in Thailand.

Red vintage Kobenstyle casserole dish with lid | H is for Home

So – a design we love, a sought after early example, great condition, amazing colour. This has all the hallmarks of a keeper! But no, stop the press, it’s for sale. The chilli red actually clashes with our orange kitchen scheme, so we’re going to let it go. It will absolutely perfect for someone out there. Available in our web shop now if that person is you!

Designer Desire: George Cook

Mosaic of George Cook pottery items for Ambleside Pottery

Earlier this week, we wrote about a piece of Ambleside pottery we bought. Today we’re going to show you a few more examples of work by its maker, George Cook. Cook was the founder and main designer-maker of Ambleside Pottery based in the southern Lake District, Cumbria. He ran the pottery from 1948 until he retired in 1968, when he sold the premises to Brian Jackson. Between 1959 & 1966, he trained Gordon Fox who currently owns & runs Kentmere Pottery.

George Cook pieces regularly come up for sale at auctions across the UK and occasionally appear on eBay. They’re very reasonably priced… for the time being!

The 1954 Rydal Women’s Institute programme reveals how the group held their April meeting at George Cook’s studio. A pottery demonstration formed part of the event. The studio was located in North Road, in an abandoned corn mill (see bottom photo taken in April 1886) by Stock Ghyll, Ambleside. The pottery remained in existence until the 1980s. At present, it operates as the Giggling Goose Café. Apparently, examples of the pottery can still be found on the roof above the kitchen window.

George Cook, founder of Ambleside Potterycredit

Stock Ghyll Mill, North Road, Amblesidecredit

Additional image credits: Worthpoint

You’re an angel

Vintage 1968 angel painting by Renate Doktor | H is for Home

This was an interesting recent buy. It’s a rather lovely painting of an angel. Archangel Michael or Gabriel perhaps? The wonderful colours and stylised nature of the piece really grabbed our attention.

Vintage 1968 angel painting by Renate Doktor | H is for Home

It was produced in 1968 by Renate Doktor – and there’s certainly something very distinctive about the treatment of the subject matter that puts it in this era. It’s painted on board – unframed, but mounted on a Hessian backing – again very common of the period.

Vintage 1968 angel painting by Renate Doktor showing signature | H is for Home

We think it’s very charming. If you’d like this particular angel to watch over you, just drop us a line. We’ve priced it up at £75.00.

Husman’s finds a home!

Vintage Husman's Potato Chips tin | H is for Home

We bought this extra large Husman’s potato chips tin at Thursday’s flea market. It’s made the long journey from Cincinnati, Ohio to Todmorden, West Yorkshire!

Vintage Husman's Potato Chips tin | H is for Home

The fabulous colours caught our eye from a long way off.

Potato Chip Institute seal on a vintage Husman's Potato Chip tin | H is for Home

As we got closer, we realised that it was a vintage tin with fabulous lettering and chirpy chip boy mascot! We reckon that it dates from the late 1960s era.

Cartoon image of a boy on a vintage Husman's Potato Chip tin | H is for Home

We love these branded wooden crates and tins. They’re very attractive and make for great up-cycled storage. And they also work really well as bedside or side tables.

Vintage Husman's Potato Chips tin being used as a side table | H is for Home

It’s perfect sitting alongside a favourite chair – a place for books, reading glasses, a vase of flowers, glass of wine or hot cuppa. We’ve become very fond of it in a short space of time. We don’t know how it got to our little Pennine town from Cincinatti, but we’re glad it did!

Designer Desire: Rosslyn Ruiz

Mosaic of Rosslyn Ruiz abstract artworks | H is for Home

A couple of weeks ago a fellow vintage dealer posted a photo on Instagram of an artwork they owned. Straight away I recognised the artist’s work – we also own one of her paintings. Her name is Rosslyn Ruiz… and it was the first time we learned of her full name.

Ruiz tended to sign her work merely ‘Rosslyn’ hence the reason we couldn’t find out anything about her before that fateful day. Ever since then, I’ve been on a quest to find out more about her and other examples of her work.

After quite a few Google searches, I stumbled upon a photo taken of the back of one of her paintings on which a label was stuck with the following inscription:

Rosslyn Ruiz was born in London in 1935. She is completely self-taught and began painting professionally in 1960 working with most recognised mediums and unconventional ones as well.

Her need to ‘create without rules’ has enabled her to explored and expand her techniques in texture and form. By combining holograms and collage with more traditional materials she creates contemporary paintings and has developed a unique style that demonstrates excitement and free spirit.

Rosslyn has had many successful exhibitions in Europe, America and Spain. She became well recognised in the 60s after her work was purchased by celebrities such as John Lennon, Jaqui Dupre, Thora Hird, Haley Mills, Jack Palance and Charles Bronson.

She appears to be still practising and is currently a member of Ely Art Society.

Additional image credits:

MyPlanet72