Cakes & Bakes: Sourdough beer loaf

Home-made sourdough beer loaf | H is for Home #sourdough #realbread #recipe

I’m continuing with Sourdough September this week and making a sourdough beer loaf using a dark, delicious porter from Acorn Brewery in Barnsley.

Sourdough beer loaf autolyse | H is for Home

I’ve been baking with sourdough – on and off – for a few years now and it can be hit & miss with the temperature of our house. This recipe that I’ve used talks about room temperature being 22ºC; we have a thermometer in our kitchen that never gets past 15ºC at the peak of summer! I’ve picked up a couple of tricks to improve the ambient environment for bread baking. In the winter, I simply put the proofing bowl/banneton near the wood-burner. In the summer I boil a mug of water in the microwave, remove it, put the bowl/banneton in and close the door. It usually works quite well.

Home-made sourdough beer loaf with bottle of Old Moor porter | H is for Home #sourdough #realbread #recipe

The web page where I found this recipe has lots of photos of the finished loaf uploaded by all the people that tried it. Lots of lovely, round boules and shapely batards. As you can tell from my photos, mine was a bit of a ‘nailed it’ attempt! It wasn’t the temperature but the consistency of my dough that was to blame.

Sliced, home-made sourdough beer loaf | H is for Home #sourdough #realbread #recipe

Starter hydration is described as a percentage – e.g. 100% hydration or 75% hydration. I wasn’t at school on the day percentages were taught and I’ve still not mastered them… maths was always my worst subject too! My starter is kept at the former percentage i.e. equal weight (not volume) of flour & water at each feeding. I don’t know where it went wrong to be honest. I should have gone with my instinct and added more flour – I could tell that I would have to pour my dough out of the banneton, almost as if it was a batter. Even so, it still managed something of a rise and tastes great! I will revisit this sourdough beer loaf recipe very soon and post the results below.

Click here to save the recipe to Pinterest for later!

Sourdough beer loaf
Yields 1
Cook Time
50 min
Cook Time
50 min
Ingredients
  1. 400g/14oz strong white flour
  2. 100g/3½oz wholemeal flour
  3. 345g/12oz bottle of beer (I used most of a 500ml bottle of Old Moor porter brewed by Acorn Brewery of Barnsley here in Yorkshire)
  4. 75g/2⅔oz water
  5. 80g/2¾oz sourdough starter
  6. 12g/½oz saltHome-made sourdough beer loaf ingredients
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Instructions
  1. Pour 345g/12oz of room temperature beer into a bowl and mix thoroughly to release the carbonation
  2. Add the 500g/17⅔oz flour mixture to the beer and mix until thoroughly incorporated into a shaggy mass
  3. Cover and set aside (autolyse) at room temperature (22ºC/72ºF) for 2-3 hours
  4. Combine the salt, water and starter and mix thoroughly before adding to the dough
  5. Fold repeatedly until everything is thoroughly mixed together and the dough begins to feel smooth
  6. Cover the mixing bowl and allow to sit for about an hour
  7. Fold the dough 8 times (8 single folds)
  8. Re-cover the mixing bowl and allow to sit for about 12 hours at room temperature (22ºC/72ºF) or until the volume of dough doubles (optionally stretch and fold periodically)
  9. Turn out the fermented dough on a lightly-floured work surface and shape into your preferred loaf (boule, batard, etc.) and then place dough into a well-floured (rice flour is preferred) proofing basket/banneton; cover and allow to sit at room temperature (22ºC/72ºF) for about an hour
  10. After 30 minutes or so, place your preferred baking vessel, stone or tray (I used my pizza steel) in the oven and preheat to 260ºC/500ºF (or your vessel's maximum safe temperature).
  11. With the dough fully risen and oven pre-heated, gently transfer the dough from the proofing basket to the baking vessel, score the top of the loaf, and then bake at 260ºC/500ºF with top on (if using) for 20 minutes
  12. Turn the oven temperature down to 230ºC/450ºF and bake for another 10 minutes
  13. Remove the top of the baking vessel (if using) and bake for 20 minutes or until the colour of the crust is as desired and the internal loaf temperature is at least 90ºC/200ºF
  14. Remove the loaf from the oven and place it on a wire rack and allow it to cool for at least an hour before slicing
Print
Adapted from Breadtopia
Adapted from Breadtopia
H is for Home Harbinger http://hisforhomeblog.com/

Bookmarks: How to Make Bread

"Bookmarks" blog post banner
How to Make Bread book with apples and homemade, buttered bread

This edition of Bookmarks is a little different…

cover of the "How to Make Bread" book

title page of the "How to Make Bread" book

…it’s a hybrid – both book review and cookery post.

cornbread recipe from the "How to Make Bread" book

hot cross bun recipe from the "How to Make Bread" book

Longtime followers of this blog will know that Adelle is partial to a bit of bread baking and she squealed with delight when this book, How to Make Bread by Emmanuel Hadjiandreou, came through the letterbox!

sourdough chapter page of the "How to Make Bread" book
image of an unbaked loaf being slashed with scissors to decorate in the "How to Make Bread" book

The recipes are divided up into basic & other yeasted breads; wheat-free or gluten-free breads; sourdoughs and pastries & sweet treats.

olive " herb bread recipe from the "How to Make Bread" book
pizza recipe from the "How to Make Bread" book

There are also really useful chapters on the basics of breadmaking and a list of suppliers & stockists of all the wonderful flours, grains and breadmaking paraphernalia.

page showing a stack of bannetons, breadboards and other baking implements in the "How to Make Bread" book

image of bread & cheese from the "How to Make Bread" cookery book

Beautifully staged photographs by Steve Painter and to die for props – Justin’s been emulating them with his breadboards, wooden spoons, herbs and dustings of flour!

instructive images on how to knead dough from the "How to Make Bread" cookery book

pitta bread recipe page from the "How to Make Bread" cookery book

The book is fantastic for a real bread beginner. It has clear, step by step images. It has inspired the resurrection of the starter that was killed in the pantry by the central heating when it was turned on last winter (that sounds like a game of Cluedo!)

tomato bread recipe page from the "How to Make Bread" book

rye bread recipe page from the "How to Make Bread" book

After an age pouring over all the different bread and pastry recipies, she chose the beer bread as her first attempt.

beer bread recipe page from the "How to Make Bread" book

ingredients gathered together to make the beer bread from the "How to Make Bread" cookery book

Here’s the recipe…

Makes 4 rolls (Adelle made 1 large loaf from the same quantity dough)

Added notes: long proofing/dough rising basket (900g/2lb capacity), greased baking sheet lined with parchment paper,
(warning, you’ll also need a collection of different sized mixing bowls!).

  • 400 g/3¼ cups malthouse flour (or 2 cups unbleached bread flour, ¾ cup multigrain blend and ½ malted wheat flakes)
  • 10 g/1 teaspoon salt
  • 200 g/1 ⅔ cups malthouse or unbleached strong/bread flour
  • 2g fresh yeast or 1g/¾ teaspoon dried/active dry yeast
  • 200g/200ml/6oz organic ale or other beer (Adelle used Marston’s Oyster Stout)
  • 4g fresh yeast or 2g/¼ teaspoon dried/active dry yeast
  • 200g/200ml/6oz organic ale or other beer
  • rolled oats, for coating

…and here’s the method…

  1. Into one (medium) mixing bowl, sift the 400 g/3¼ cups malthouse flour (or equivalent) and empty the sifted larger grains into a shallow dish. Set aside.
  2. Mix the salt with the sifted flour and set aside. This is the dry mixture
  3. Into another (smaller) mixing bowl, sift the 200 g/1 ⅔ cups malthouse flour (or equivalent) and empty the sifted larger grains into the dish with the rest of the reserved grains.
  4. Into another (larger) mixing bowl, weigh out the 2g fresh yeast (or equivalent). Add the 200g/200ml/6oz ale and stir until the yeast has dissolved. This is the wet mixture. (Leave the second batch of ale in a cool place, but not in the refrigerator.)
  5. Mix the 200 g/1 ⅔ cups sifted flour into the wet mixture until it comes together.
  6. Cover and let ferment overnight in a cool place.
  7. The next day, in a (smaller) mixing bowl, weigh out the 4g fresh yeast (or equivalent). Add the remaining 200g/200ml/6oz ale and stir until the yeast has dissolved. (Don’t worry if the ale has gone flat.) Pour into the fermented ale mixture and mix.
  8. Now add the reserved dry mixture and mix with a wooden spoon until it comes together.
  9. Cover with the bowl that had the dry mixture in it and let stand for 10 minutes.
  10. After 10 minutes knead as follows: [in the bowl, pull a portion of the dough up from the side ans press it in the middle. Turn the bowl slightly and repeat this process with another portion of the dough. Repeat another 8 times. The whole process should only take about 10 seconds and the dough should start to resist.] Cover the bowl again and let stand for 10 minutes.
  11. Repeat this step three times, but the last rising should be for 1 hour.
  12. When the dough has doubled in volume, punch it down. Lightly dust a clean work surface with flour. Transfer the ball of dough to the floured work surface.
  13. Divide the dough into 4 equal portions using a metal dough scraper or sharp serrated knife.
  14. Take each portion of dough and roll between your hands until you get a perfectly round, smooth ball.
  15. Add as many oats as you like to the reserved dish of malted grains and mix.
  16. Roll the top of each ball of dough in the grain mixture. Place, grain side down, into a prepared proofing basket/banneton.
  17. Let the dough rise until slightly less than double the size – 30-45 minutes.
  18. About 20 minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 240°C/475°F/Gas Mark 9 and put a baking stone in to heat up. Place a roasting pan at the bottom of the oven to preheat. Fill a cup with water.
  19. Tip the basket upside down onto the bread peel and lift it away from the risen dough. Slide the bread onto the hot baking stone, pour the reserved cupful of water onto the hot roasting pan and lower the temperature to 200°C/400°F/Gas Mark 6.
  20. Bake for 30 minutes.
  21. To check if it is baked through, tip it upside down and tap the bottom – it should sound hollow.
  22. If it’s not ready, return to the oven for a few minutes. Set it on a wire rack to cool.

…and here’s Adelle’s finished loaf…

beer bread from the "How to Make Bread" cookery book

sliced & buttered beer bread from the "How to Make Bread" cookery book

close up view of beer bread from the "How to Make Bread" cookery book

You can get your copy of How to Make Bread from the Cico website. And as usual, it’s also available from Hive and the H is for Home Amazon aStores in the UK and USA

[Many thanks to Sarah at Ryland Peters & Small and Cico Books]