Cakes & Bakes: Bonnag

Sliced, home-made bonnag | H is for Home

A couple of weeks ago, we were watching an episode of Countryfile where they visited the Isle of Man.

Flour and cubes of cold butter in a mixing bowl | H is for Home

One of the features they did from there was the annual Bonnag World Championships – which, last year, was won by 11-year-old Tom Keig.

Bonnag dough | H is for Home

Bonnag is a traditional Manx bread which, it is believed, has been around for hundreds of years. It can be ‘plain’ as I’ve made here or can be sweet with the addition of dried fruit such as currants, raisins, candied peel and mixed spice.

Loaf of home-made bonnag | H is for Home

I went in search of a recipe but could only find ones with sketchy quantities and instructions. I guessed at the consistency and wetness of the dough. I thought it would be really similar to Irish soda bread in its ingredients and method. Anyway, it turned out really well. It was delicious straight from the oven with a smearing of butter!

Click here or on the image below to pin the recipe for later.

Manx bonnag recipe | H is for Home

Bonnag
The national bread of the Isle of Man
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
55 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
55 min
Ingredients
  1. 450g/16oz plain flour
  2. pinch salt
  3. 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  4. 1tsp cream of tartar
  5. 60g/2oz cold butter, cubed
  6. 250g buttermilkHome-made bonnag ingredients
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Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF/Gas mark 4
  2. Grease a baking tray and set aside
  3. In a large mixing bowl, sift together all the dry ingredients
  4. Rub in the cubed butter and make a well in the centre
  5. Pour in the buttermilk and mix until the dough just comes together
  6. Tip the dough on to a lightly floured work surface and form it into a ball. Do not over-knead
  7. Place the ball of dough on to the greased baking tray and bake for ¾ of an hour or until the top becomes golden brown
  8. Allow to cool on a wire rack
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H is for Home Harbinger http://hisforhomeblog.com/

Cakes & Bakes: Piadina

Piadina with olives, hummus and rocket | H is for Home

Prior to making these flatbreads, I’d never heard of piadina. That’s strange really, seeing as flatbreads from other countries are so well known – pitta, tortilla, chapati, roti…

Ball of piadina dough | H is for Home

Piadina is from the Emilia-Romagna region of north eastern Italy. It’s an area renowned for its food; the same area that produces Parmigiano Reggiano, Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale and the origin of pastas such as tortellini, lasagne and tagliatelle.

Stack of freshly-made piadina | H is for Home

This basic flatbread is traditionally made of plain white flour, lard or olive oil, salt and water and served as a street food. It’s eaten as an accompaniment to cheeses, cold meats and vegetables or with sweet fillings such as jam or chocolate spread.

These are quick, easy and delicious – devour them while they’re still warm with a selection of dips!

Piadina
Yields 4
Ingredients
  1. 175g/6oz plain flour
  2. 1tsp salt
  3. 15ml/1tbsp olive oil
  4. 105ml/7tbsp lukewarm waterHome-made piadina ingredients
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Instructions
  1. Sift the flour and salt together into a large bowl; make a well in the centre
  2. Add the oil and water to the centre of the flour and gradually mix in to form a dough
  3. Knead on a lightly floured surface for 4-5 minutes until smooth and elastic
  4. Place in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with oild cling film and leave to rest for 20 minutes
  5. Heat a griddle over a medium heat
  6. Divide the dough into four equal pieces and roll each into 18cm/7-inch round
  7. Cover until ready to cook
  8. Lightly oil the hot griddle, add one or two piadine and cook for about 2 minutes or until they are starting to brown
  9. Turn the piadine over and cook for a further 1-1½ minutes
  10. Serve warm
Notes
  1. If you don't have a griddle, a large heavy frying pan will work just as well
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Adapted from Bread
Adapted from Bread
H is for Home Harbinger http://hisforhomeblog.com/
Click here or on the image below to pin the recipe for later!

Piadina recipe | H is for Home

Cakes & Bakes: Beetroot loaf

Home-made beetroot loaf | H is for Home

My Pinterest stream is always full of food photos – predominately cake, fudge, biscuits and bread. One in particular caught my eye last week… a beetroot loaf. The colour is amazing and I love beetroot anyway.

Grated beetroot, yeast mixture and mixing bowl of strong bread flour | H is for Home

I had a search through many of my cook books and finally found a beetroot loaf recipe in Bread. The recipe is designed for electric bread-makers (there’s a whole section of bread-maker recipes in the book if that’s your preferred way of making bread!) but it’s fine to use if you’re making it by hand.

Ball of beetrot loaf dough | H is for Home

Just mix the yeast and sugar in the water using a small measuring jug or cup, combine the flour and salt in a large mixing bowl making a well in the centre, pour in the yeast mixture and bring together roughly. Chuck in the beetroot, spring onions and butter (I omitted the last two ingredients) then knead well for about 10 minutes. Cover the mixing bowl in cling film (or put it inside a big clear [reusable] plastic bag like I do). Allow it to rise in a warm place until doubled in size. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl, punch down and put it into a loaf tin or well-floured banneton. Allow to double in size again before (transferring from the banneton to a greased oven tray) baking in a preheated oven at 220ºC/425ºF/Gas mark 7 for 30-40 minutes or until it sounds hollow when knocked on the base.

Home-made beetroot loaf with wooden handled bread knife | H is for Home

It was beautiful and absolutely delicious! Slightly sweet with a slightly earthy flavour. I had it with goats cheese and horseradish and Justin had the same in addition to a char-grilled sirloin steak.

Click here or the image below to pin the recipe for later!

Home-made beetroot loaf | H is for Home

Beetroot loaf
SMALL
  1. 150ml/5fl oz/⅔ cup water
  2. 140g/5oz/1 cup grated raw beetroot
  3. 2 spring onions, chopped
  4. 375g/13oz/3¼ cups unbleached white bread flour
  5. 15g/½oz/1tbsp butter
  6. 1½tsp salt
  7. 1tsp granulated sugar
  8. 1tsp easy-blend (rapid-rise) dried yeast
MEDIUM
  1. 170ml/6fl oz/¾ cup water
  2. 225g/8oz/1½ cup grated raw beetroot
  3. 3 spring onions, chopped
  4. 500g/1lb 2oz/4½ cups unbleached white bread flour
  5. 25g/1oz/2tbsp butter
  6. 2tsp salt
  7. 1tsp granulated sugar
  8. 1tsp easy-blend (rapid-rise) dried yeast
LARGE
  1. 280ml/1ofl oz/1¼ cup water
  2. 280g/10oz/2 cups grated raw beetroot
  3. 4 spring onions, chopped
  4. 675g/1 ½lbs/6 cups unbleached white bread flour
  5. 40g/1½oz/3tbsp butter
  6. 2tsp salt
  7. 1½tsp granulated sugar
  8. 1½tsp easy-blend (rapid-rise) dried yeast
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Instructions
  1. Pour the water into the bread pan. Sprinkle over the grated beetroot. If the instructions for your machine specify that the yeast is to be placed in the pan first, reverse the order in which you add the liquid mixture and dry ingredients
  2. Add the chopped spring onions. However, if your bread machine offers you the option of adding any extra ingredients during the kneading cycle, set the spring onions aside so that you may add them later on
  3. Sprinkle the flour over the beetroot and water, ensuring it covers them both. Add the butter, salt and sugar in separate corners. Make a small indent in the centre of the flour (but not down as far as the liquid) and add the yeast
  4. Set the bread machine to the basic/normal setting, medium crust. Press start. If you like, slash the top of the loaf with diagonal slashes just before the baking cycle starts
  5. Remove at the end of the baking cycle and turn out on to a wire rack
Notes
  1. If you prefer an all-over red loaf rather than speckled, purée the raw beetroot in a mini-food processor instead of grating it
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Adapted from Bread
Adapted from Bread
H is for Home Harbinger http://hisforhomeblog.com/

Cakes & Bakes: Walnut and sultana loaf

Sliced, home-made walnut and sultana loaf | H is for Home

I’ve decided to make a walnut and sultana loaf this week by tweaking a basic white bread recipe that I regularly use. I didn’t have enough white flour in store so I substituted a quarter with wholemeal. It was a good decision as it added to the nuttiness of the finished loaf.

Home-made walnut and sultana loaf dough in a mixing bowl with cane banneton | H is for Home

Sliced or torn pieces of this bread will go amazingly well with a mild, creamy blue cheese such as Dolcelatte, Saint Agur or Roquefort.

Home-made walnut and sultana loaf dough profing in a cane banneton | H is for Home Home-made walnut and sultana loaf dough profing in a cane banneton | H is for Home

Another good option would be a couple of dipping bowls of good quality olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Once the loaf’s a couple of days old, have it toasted and spread with butter and honey.

Home-made walnut and sultana loaf | H is for Home

Walnut and sultana loaf
Ingredients
  1. 7g/¼oz fast action yeast
  2. 1tsp sugar
  3. 300ml/10½fl oz warm water
  4. 500g/18oz strong bread flour
  5. 1tsp salt
  6. 50g/1¾oz chopped walnuts
  7. 50g/1¾oz sultanasHome-made walnut and sultana loaf ingredients
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Instructions
  1. In a measuring jug, stir the yeast and sugar into the warm water. Leave for 10 minutes for the yeast to begin working
  2. In a large mixing bowl add the flour. Make a well in the centre
  3. Add the liquid and knead until a smooth ball of dough is formed (I used my Kenwood mixer with dough hook attachment on a low speed for about 10 minutes, but you can do it by hand on a floured work surface for about 20 minutes)
  4. Cover the mixing bowl with cling film or put it into a large, clear plastic bag and leave in a warm place until the dough has doubled in size.
  5. Add the salt, chopped walnuts and sultanas and knead lightly until the fruit & nuts are evenly distributed through the dough
  6. Place in a greased loaf tin (or in a well-floured banneton like I did) and re-cover and allow to prove again until doubled in size
  7. Preheat the oven to 260ºC/500ºF/Gas mark 10, put an empty roasting dish on the bottom shelf of the oven and fill a cup with cold water and set aside
  8. Once the loaf has risen, if using a banneton, grease a baking sheet and gently decant the loaf on to it, trying not to knock any air out of it
  9. Quickly & carefully pour the cup of water into the roasting dish before putting the loaf into the oven
  10. After 10 minutes, turn the oven down to 200ºC/ 400ºF/Gas mark 6
  11. Bake for a further 20-25 minutes before taking it out of the oven
  12. Leave to cool on a wire rack for at least half an hour before use
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H is for Home Harbinger http://hisforhomeblog.com/

Cakes & Bakes: Panipopo

Portion of home-made panipopo torn form the loaf | H is for Home

I’ve been seeing recipes for panipopo sweeping by on my Pinterest feed for quite a while. I’ve never really stopped & clicked because I thought that the sweetened coconut bread would be too wet and sickly.

Panipopo dough | H is for Home Risen panipopo dough | H is for Home

How wrong I was! I’m glad I read some of the comments remarking on how delicious it is and how ex-pat islanders hanker after it when they’re away from home.

Rolled & sliced panipopo dough | H is for Home Panipopo dough in a rectangular baking tin | H is for Home

Panipopo (or pani-popo or pani popo) is a Polynesian bread originating from Samoa or Hawaii – depending on who you believe.

Risen panipopo dough in a rectangular baking tin | H is for Home Pouring sweetened coconut milk on the risen panipopo dough | H is for Home

I thought that all that liquid would make for a soggy bread, but most of it is absorbed by the dough in cooking. The liquid that is left turns into a thick, unctuous, syrupy sauce. We weren’t sure what to eat it with – I chose to have it as it comes, dunking it in more of the  sauce that I’d reserved. Justin went all adventurous and had his with a little bit of Cambozola…  he reckons it’s a winner.

Cooked panipopo on a oven cloth | H is for Home

Here’s the recipe – why don’t you have a go? Let us know what you think!

Cakes & Bakes: Daktyla

Home-made daktyla | H is for Home

A couple of weeks ago, I bought a small jar of black onion seeds with the plan of using it in and sprinkled on a home-made loaf of onion bread. Little did I know that onion seeds aren’t actually… onion seeds! I tasted a pinch expecting a blast of onion flavour, it had a slight onion/black pepper/earthy taste, not altogether unpleasant though.

Bubbling bread sponge | H is for Home

When I looked it up, black onion seeds are actually nigella seeds; they’re also commonly known as black cumin or kalonji. Love in a Mist, which grows on our allotment, is a very close relation. I wonder whether it’s seeds are also edible.

Mixture of sponge, flour, olive oil and seeds | H is for Home

Anyhow, since my onion loaf idea was scuppered (at least for the time being) I looked into what I could make using my black onion seeds. That’s when I came across daktyla, a Greek/Cypriot/Turkish rustic bread.

Rising daktyla dough | H is for Home

The seeds are mixed with sesame seeds both in and atop a sort of tear-and-share loaf made up of rows of dough. Δάχτυλα, (daktyla in Greek) means ‘fingers’.

Daktyla dough balls | H is for Home Daktyla dough batons

I just happened to have a large bag of black sesame seeds that I bought in a Chinese supermarket, so I already had all the necessary ingredients in stock.

Sprinkling seeds on daktyla dough | H is for Home

There was quite a lot of proofing time involved – an hour for the sponge, 90 minutes for the first proof, another 90 for the second – but it meant that I could get on and do other things in between time.

Details of cooked daktyla | H is for Home

It was delicious with baba ganoush and salad. I imagine it would go down well with hummus, feta and Anari cheeses, olives and cured meats.