Designer Desire: Stig Lindberg

Mosaic of Stig Lindberg designs | H is for Home

I can’t believe it’s taken us so many months to feature Stig Lindberg in our Designer Desire series. He’s one of our favourite mid century modern designers… and he would have turned 100 this year! We’ve had a mere sprinkling of his work in our possession over the years.

He worked at Gustavsberg from 1937 – being made Art Director in 1949 – until 1957 when he left for 13 years to become a university lecturer. He rejoined the company for a decade until 1980, two years before his death in Italy of a heart attack.

Although he is most well known for being a ceramic designer, he has successfully tried his hand at lots of other media and artforms including enamelware, plastics, glass, children’s book illustration, textile design and product design. He designed items as wide-ranging as an enamel barbecue to a plastic citrus press, a money box in the shape of a Scottie dog to a large sculptural copper fountain.

There have been a few books written about Stig Lindberg but they a fairly rare and therefore quite pricey. I dream of finding one languishing idly on a charity shop bookshelf… or even better, one of the ones he himself illustrated!

Stig Lindberg portraitcredit

Image credits:

eBay | Etsy | 1st Dibs | Kirk Modern

Elayne Fallon Circus

Vintage 'Circus' breakfast set designed by Elayne Fallon for Staffordshire Potteries | H is for Home

Ladies & gentlemen, boys & girls… please let us introduce a fabulous display of animals, carriages, lion tamers, strong men and clowns! What a lovely way to start the day – breakfast served on this cheery crockery!

Detail of a lion from a vintage 'Circus' breakfast set designed by Elayne Fallon for Staffordshire Potteries | H is for Home

They’re from the ‘Circus’ range designed by Elayne Fallon for Staffordshire Potteries Ltd in the 1960s/70s.

Base stamp detail from a vintage 'Circus' breakfast set designed by Elayne Fallon for Staffordshire Potteries | H is for Home

This little set comprises mug, cereal bowl, egg cup and plate – everything you might need!

Vintage 'Circus' breakfast set designed by Elayne Fallon for Staffordshire Potteries | H is for Home

The pieces are dinky, but not miniature – so whilst they’re no doubt intended for children, there’s certainly no reason why us grown ups can’t enjoy our egg and soldiers served on them too!

Designer Desire: Anita Nylund

Mosaic of Anita Nylund designs | H is for Home

Born in 1931, Anita Nylund is the daughter of the late Gunnar Nylund, Artistic Director of Rörstrand. Her grandfather Felix was a Finnish painter and sculptor, so she’s from a great artistic pedigree.

She studied at Otte Skölds Målarskola in Stockholm and then on to Paris and Florence. On her return to Sweden, she began working as a ceramic designer at Jie Gantofta where she produced a plethora of often folk-inspired designs.

The patterns included ‘Vår lilla stad’ (Our small town), ‘Familjen Pepparsson’ (Pepper family), ‘Prisma’ (Prism), ‘Cookie’ and ‘Janssons frestelse’ (Jansson’s temptation). They decorate plates, platters and serving dishes, salt & pepper shakers, salt pigs, butter dishes and all manner and size of storage jars.

Examples can be found readily on eBay and are still fairly affordable for the time being. Definitely one to watch!

Portrait of Anita Nylundcredit

Image credits:

Auctionet | Etsy | Tradera

Designer Desire: Inger Waage

Mosaic of Inger Waage designs | H is for Home

Inger Waage was a long-serving designer working on ceramics at the Norwegian company, Stavangerflint. She began with them in 1953, continued when the firm merged with Figgjo Flint in 1968 and on until they closed the Stavanger branch in 1979.

One of our favourite of the many, many designs of hers is the dark haired lady with almond shaped eyes, huge earrings and flowers in her hair. She uses this motif again and again on bowls, vases, plates and lidded containers.

Some of her best loved and desirable tableware designs include Lotus, Bambus, Pernile and Kongo.

Portrait of Inger Waage

Additional image credits:

Etsy | Ebay | Pinterest | Ole Gustavsen



Designer Desire: Lisa Larson

Mosaic of Lisa Larson's ceramic work | H is for Home

Born in 1931, Lisa Larson is a Swedish ceramic designer. She worked for Gustavsberg, under Stig Lindberg, from the 1954 through to 1980 when she branched out on her own working for, amongst others, Royal Krona, Duka, Åhléns department stores and Kooperativa Förbundet.

Larson is probably best known for her small sculptures of animals and children of the world, but we absolutely adore her glazed tiles. The Viking ship at the top right of the mosaic is ours – and we’ve also got an elephant. So, it’s a collection of just two at the moment – but we’ve always got our eyes peeled hoping to happen across more. 🙂 

As you can probably tell, Larson is an animal lover – but she verges on the obsessive when it comes to cats!

Lisa Larson with a collection of her cat figures with a siamese cat on her shouldercredit

If you have a look at the short film below, she has the most beautiful sculpture of a cat which just begs to be stroked – so tactile. If you don’t speak Swedish, you can turn on subtitles by clicking on the left icon (next to the one that looks like a cog) along the bottom panel.

Image credits:
1st Dibs | Etsy | eBay

Designer Desire: Ann Wynn-Reeves

Collage of Ann Wynn-Reeves ceramic works | H is for Home

Ann Wynn-Reeves, in our opinion, is one of the most gifted, distinctive British ceramic designers of the 20th century.

Not much is known about her as an individual, we couldn’t even find a photograph of her on the internet. She’s the wife of the late Kenneth Clark who is much more well-known than Wynn-Reeves. They spent a lifetime working together – she created the designs and he translated them into ceramic form, especially tiles.

Some of her tile designs are currently being reproduced by Robert Opie. It has even been made in miniature form for dolls’ houses (see the image right, 3rd from the top)!

Image credits:

Mallams | Pinterest | Etsy | eBay | Flickr | Planet Utopia