Designer Desire: Anita Nylund

Mosaic of Anita Nylund designs | H is for Home

Born in 1931, Anita Nylund is the daughter of the late Gunnar Nylund, Artistic Director of Rörstrand. Her grandfather Felix was a Finnish painter and sculptor, so she’s from a great artistic pedigree.

She studied at Otte Skölds Målarskola in Stockholm and then on to Paris and Florence. On her return to Sweden, she began working as a ceramic designer at Jie Gantofta where she produced a plethora of often folk-inspired designs.

The patterns included ‘Vår lilla stad’ (Our small town), ‘Familjen Pepparsson’ (Pepper family), ‘Prisma’ (Prism), ‘Cookie’ and ‘Janssons frestelse’ (Jansson’s temptation). They decorate plates, platters and serving dishes, salt & pepper shakers, salt pigs, butter dishes and all manner and size of storage jars.

Examples can be found readily on eBay and are still fairly affordable for the time being. Definitely one to watch!

Portrait of Anita Nylundcredit

Image credits:

Auctionet | Etsy | Tradera

Designer Desire: Inger Waage

Mosaic of Inger Waage designs | H is for Home

Inger Waage was a long-serving designer working on ceramics at the Norwegian company, Stavangerflint. She began with them in 1953, continued when the firm merged with Figgjo Flint in 1968 and on until they closed the Stavanger branch in 1979.

One of our favourite of the many, many designs of hers is the dark haired lady with almond shaped eyes, huge earrings and flowers in her hair. She uses this motif again and again on bowls, vases, plates and lidded containers.

Some of her best loved and desirable tableware designs include Lotus, Bambus, Pernile and Kongo.

Portrait of Inger Waage

Additional image credits:

Etsy | Ebay | Pinterest | Ole Gustavsen

Designer Desire: Lisa Larson

Mosaic of Lisa Larson's ceramic work | H is for Home

Born in 1931, Lisa Larson is a Swedish ceramic designer. She worked for Gustavsberg, under Stig Lindberg, from the 1954 through to 1980 when she branched out on her own working for, amongst others, Royal Krona, Duka, Åhléns department stores and Kooperativa Förbundet.

Larson is probably best known for her small sculptures of animals and children of the world, but we absolutely adore her glazed tiles. The Viking ship at the top right of the mosaic is ours – and we’ve also got an elephant. So, it’s a collection of just two at the moment – but we’ve always got our eyes peeled hoping to happen across more. 🙂 

As you can probably tell, Larson is an animal lover – but she verges on the obsessive when it comes to cats!

Lisa Larson with a collection of her cat figures with a siamese cat on her shouldercredit

If you have a look at the short film below, she has the most beautiful sculpture of a cat which just begs to be stroked – so tactile. If you don’t speak Swedish, you can turn on subtitles by clicking on the left icon (next to the one that looks like a cog) along the bottom panel.

Image credits:
1st Dibs | Etsy | eBay

Designer Desire: Ann Wynn-Reeves

Collage of Ann Wynn-Reeves ceramic works | H is for Home

Ann Wynn-Reeves, in our opinion, is one of the most gifted, distinctive British ceramic designers of the 20th century.

Not much is known about her as an individual, we couldn’t even find a photograph of her on the internet. She’s the wife of the late Kenneth Clark who is much more well-known than Wynn-Reeves. They spent a lifetime working together – she created the designs and he translated them into ceramic form, especially tiles.

Some of her tile designs are currently being reproduced by Robert Opie. It has even been made in miniature form for dolls’ houses (see the image right, 3rd from the top)!

Image credits:

Mallams | Pinterest | Etsy | eBay | Flickr | Planet Utopia

Vintage Micratex Catrina cups

Micratex Catrina mugs with chocolate digestive biscuits | H is for Home

You don’t come across these everyday, so we thought that they were definitely worth featuring in a blog post. We are, of course, referring to the cups and not the chocolate digestives!

Micratex Catrina mugs with chocolate digestive biscuits and cafetiere cover | H is for Home

This range of crockery is very hard to find – in fact we’ve been waiting for about 10 years to find a piece. The pattern will be very familiar to vintage fans – the unmistakable Lotus pattern designed by Arne Clausen – and famously used on Cathrineholm enamelware – kettles, coffee pots, saucepans et al – shapes designed by Greta Prytz Kittelsen. Here it’s being used in this range of vintage crockery made in England.

Adams Micratex Catrina mug base stamp

It was produced by Adams Pottery – a member of the Wedgewood group. Their range is called Micratex Catrina, but there’s no doubting it’s identical to Lotus. It was being produced way back in the 1960s. Did Arne Clausen give Adams permission to use it – or did Adams copy it? We’re not sure – it’s a rare oddity.

Micratex Catrina mugs showing 'Lotus' detail | H is for Home

We’ll enjoy drinking our coffee out of them whilst we investigate further!

Tibor Reich exhibition

Tibor Reich tapestry | H is for Home

Last week, I made an all too rare visit to Manchester; I was meeting a friend at the Whitworth to view the Tibor Reich exhibition.

Tibor Reich exhibition room at the Whitworth in Manchester | H is for Home

Tibor Reich mural at the Whitworth in Manchester | H is for Home

Tigoware sketch by Tibor Reich displayed at the Whitworth

Tibor Reich Tigo-Ware 'Florence' and 'Espanola' vases | H is for Home

It was wonderful seeing his work ‘in the flesh’ so to speak, rather than in books or on the internet, to appreciate the scale. The ‘Florence’ Tigo-Ware vase on the left of the photo above is over a foot tall.

Examples of Tigo-Ware designed by Tibor Reich and produced by Denby Pottery in the 1950s | H is for Home

Tibor Reich designed ceramic tiles | H is for Home

His black & white sgraffito designs are very eye-catching and distinctive.

Ceramic ashtrays designed by Tibor Reich | H is for Home

Apparently, he designed and produced these keyhole-shaped ashtrays as presents for friends one Christmas. I’ve never seen one on the open market, they’re absolutely beautiful!

Ceramic ashtray designed by Tibor Reich | H is for Home

Tibor Reich pen & ink sketches | H is for Home

A lot of his ceramic work is concerned with the female form and visage – my friend and I wondered whether his wife Freda, who was pictured in many of the photographs in the exhibition, acted as his muse.

Colour sketches of women by Tibor Reich | H is for Home

A displat of tools and other objects used by Tibor Reich | H is for Home

Tibor Reich's sitting room which he designed himself | H is for Home

Reich may be best known for his textiles (his designs were on the seats of Concorde and the QE II), however his practice was multifaceted. Ceramics, fine art, photography… he even designed his own home including the ‘flaming onion’ fire in his sitting room, shown above.


A photo posted by TIBOR (@tiborreich) on

Tibor Reich: Art of Colour and Texture, shown above, was published earlier this month to accompany the exhibition. It can be purchased here (£35.00). The Tibor Reich exhibition runs until August 2016, so you still have lots of time to check it out – it’s well worth it! If you can’t get to Manchester, the University of Leeds (where he studied) have a huge archive of his textile work which can be viewed online.

Wallpaper display at the Whitworth in Manchester | H is for Home

In an adjoining room, there was an exhibition of vintage wallpaper (which runs until the 4th of September 2016). With the room’s huge, tall walls the long rolls were shown off to spectacular effect.

Wallpaper display at the Whitworth in Manchester | H is for Home

Although I loved most of the designs, it also made me realise how overpowering some of the patterns would be if all four walls in a room were papered. A small feature wall would suffice!

Vintage 'Promenade' wallpaper sample | H is for Home

There were display cabinets of wallpaper samples – here are two of my favourites.

Vintage wallpaper sample with birds pattern | H is for Home