Designer Desire: Bjørn Wiinblad

Mosaic of Bjørn Wiinblad designs | H is for Home

We’ve mentioned Bjørn Wiinblad a number of times on our blog in the past but for some reason have never dedicated an entire, detailed post to the man with pictorial examples showing the range of his work. Wiinblad (1918-2006) was primarily a ceramicist; his plates, vases, candle-holders figures et al are decorated with wistful and magical figures. We have a colourful charger from his ‘1001 Nights’ series for Rosenthal which firmly fits this description. He also designed and produced many pieces using other materials such as glass, metal and textiles.

According to the man himself:

It can never be the quantity of a thing that is wrong – it can only be the quality. I put just as much thought, just as many deliberations, and just as great zeal into doing the right thing in my work when I make wrapping paper as I do when I create a decoration for the Royal Ballet.

Some of his designs are still being produced today and can be found on websites such as Connox and Trouva. If his vintage work is more your thing, check out eBay and Etsy.

Portrait of Bjørn Wiinbladcredit

Additional image credits:

1st Dibs

Designer Desire: Bent Gabrielsen

Mosaic of Bent Gabrielsen jewellery | H is for Home

Every week that goes by, I discover yet another brilliant Scandinavian jeweller. Today, it’s multi-award-winning Bent Gabrielsen (1928-2014).

In 1949 in Copenhagen, Gabrielsen completed his gold-smithing apprenticeship. He followed this with a 3-year course at the College of Jewelry, Silversmithing, and Professional Trade Design in the city. He went on immediately to work for Hans Hansen from 1953 as a jewellery designer where he remained until 1969, by which time he’d become responsible for the company’s entire output. After leaving the company, he set up in partnership with his wife under the name, ‘Gabrielsen’s Guldsmedie’.

When he won the Lunning Prize in 1964, Erik Bohr, the Chairman of the Committee commented:

Bent Gabrielsen’s jewelry carries absolute conviction as to its function; his handling of materials is so restrained and well considered that one feels this could hardly be otherwise. His jewelry is simple and clearly constructed, often with links connecting naturally with each other so that the complete piece makes up a beautiful whole. Every single detail of his things is worked out. There are no false effects. He does not take the easy way out.

Here’s a film giving an in-depth look at the maker’s life, work and ethos.

Find available examples of his work on eBay and Etsy.

Portrait of Bent Gabrielsencredit

Additional image credits:

1stDibs | Artnet

Get their look: Monochrome open-plan living space

Monochrome open-plan living spacecredit

This monochrome open-plan living space belongs to textile designer and Rosendahl Design Group Creative Director, David Andersen‘s Copenhagen home.

Wonderful light enters the space from all directions – the kitchen area being particularly blessed, which is ideal for food preparation and cooking tasks.

It’s a very pared back, masculine interior – no unnecessary fuss in evidence here. The interior décor has a  strong design-led feel with some real Scandi classics in evidence. It’s striking, yet very functional.

  1. PH ‘Snowball’ pendant lamp by Louis Poulsen
  2. Set of 2 Kay Bojesen Lovebirds
  3. Verner Panton ‘Panthella’ floor lamp
  4. CH24 Wishbone Chair black beech & black paper cord seat
  5. ‘About a stool’ bar stool by Hay
  6. Kubus 8 Candleholder by Lassen
  7. Fredericia No1 3-seater sofa designed by Børge Mogensen

Have a look at some of the other interiors (and exteriors) that we’ve featured in our Get their look series.

Get their look: Monochrome open-plan living space | H is for Home

The very stylish Kobenstyle

Red vintage Kobenstyle casserole pan | H is for Home

We bought this gorgeous vintage chilli red enamel pan this week. It’s from the Kobenstyle range designed by Jens Quistgaard for Dansk Designs.

Collection of vintage homewares acquired this week | H is for Home

It was one object from a very colourful array picked up at a local flea market. We like them all, but the casserole has to be our favourite. We’ve always loved this design – it’s both practical and great to look at. The pans are hard-wearing and easy to manipulate & move around. The lid can also be turned upside down to act as a trivet for the hot pan. It’s an absolute kitchen classic!

Dansk Designs stamp to the bottom of a red vintage Kobenstyle casserole dish with lid | H is for Home

This particular stamp (‘four duck’ logo & ‘Denmark’) means that the pan was produced in Denmark somewhere between 1959 & 1965. Later pieces were produced in France and Japan. It was out of production for quite a while, but the range has been re-issued and is now produced in Thailand.

Red vintage Kobenstyle casserole dish with lid | H is for Home

So – a design we love, a sought after early example, great condition, amazing colour. This has all the hallmarks of a keeper! But no, stop the press, it’s for sale. The chilli red actually clashes with our orange kitchen scheme, so we’re going to let it go. It will absolutely perfect for someone out there. Available in our web shop now if that person is you!

Get their look: Feminine Scandi dining room

Feminine Scandi dining roomcredit

This feminine Scandi dining room is the domain of Pernille and her family. She’s a blogger, Instagrammer and homeware shop owner based over in Denmark.

The repetition of deep purple, soft pink and grey is very pleasing on the eye. The deep, wine colour on the right-hand wall is Sadolin‘s ‘Shady Red’. The light pink colour on the far wall is ‘Soft Blush’ from the same company. ‘Creme de la Rose’ by Crown is very similar to the latter, and is available here in the UK. The glossy, white-painted floorboards bounce sunlight up & around the room.

Soft textiles, potted cacti, hanging kokedama and framed artwork give a homely feel.

  1. Galaxy Globe mobile, large, dark green
  2. Nordic Tales Bright Spot pendant
  3. Hanging succulent kokedama
  4. Livink Braid pillows
  5. by Lassen – Kubus 4 candle holder, brass
  6. We Design magazine holder
  7. Hans Wegner Y chair (CH24)
  8. Crown matt emulsion paint Creme de la Rose
  9. Hay Loop stand table
  10. Large sheepskin rugs

Get their look: Feminine Scandi dining room | H is for Home

Mannequin mystery

Detail of the top of a vintage metal mannequin | H is for Home

We had a mystery mannequin on our hands this week. It caught our eye at the local flea market and we liked the form. It looked familiar, but we weren’t sure who the designer actually was. We thought it dated from the 1980s era – and had an Ikea look about it. You’d expect the internet to be full of pictures of relatively recent Ikea products, but there were hardly any to be found.

Vintage metal mannequin | H is for Home

We delved a little further and think it was designed by Laurids Lønborg of Denmark – you can certainly find miniature versions of it with the original Laurids Lonborg label. And the Ikea hunch seems correct as we think this large, 6ft tall version was indeed sold through some Ikea stores in the 1980s/90s. There were produced in both male and female forms – strong, yet simple lines and and very Memphis Group in style.

Detail of the base of a vintage metal mannequin | H is for Home

It’s quite an attention grabber. They’re not at all common and getting quite sought after it seems. If you want first dibs before it gets listed on eBay or taken to our antiques centre space, then just drop us a line.