Tibor Reich exhibition

Tibor Reich tapestry | H is for Home

Last week, I made an all too rare visit to Manchester; I was meeting a friend at the Whitworth to view the Tibor Reich exhibition.

Tibor Reich exhibition room at the Whitworth in Manchester | H is for Home

Tibor Reich mural at the Whitworth in Manchester | H is for Home

Tigoware sketch by Tibor Reich displayed at the Whitworth

Tibor Reich Tigo-Ware 'Florence' and 'Espanola' vases | H is for Home

It was wonderful seeing his work ‘in the flesh’ so to speak, rather than in books or on the internet, to appreciate the scale. The ‘Florence’ Tigo-Ware vase on the left of the photo above is over a foot tall.

Examples of Tigo-Ware designed by Tibor Reich and produced by Denby Pottery in the 1950s | H is for Home

Tibor Reich designed ceramic tiles | H is for Home

His black & white sgraffito designs are very eye-catching and distinctive.

Ceramic ashtrays designed by Tibor Reich | H is for Home

Apparently, he designed and produced these keyhole-shaped ashtrays as presents for friends one Christmas. I’ve never seen one on the open market, they’re absolutely beautiful!

Ceramic ashtray designed by Tibor Reich | H is for Home

Tibor Reich pen & ink sketches | H is for Home

A lot of his ceramic work is concerned with the female form and visage – my friend and I wondered whether his wife Freda, who was pictured in many of the photographs in the exhibition, acted as his muse.

Colour sketches of women by Tibor Reich | H is for Home

A displat of tools and other objects used by Tibor Reich | H is for Home

Tibor Reich's sitting room which he designed himself | H is for Home

Reich may be best known for his textiles (his designs were on the seats of Concorde and the QE II), however his practice was multifaceted. Ceramics, fine art, photography… he even designed his own home including the ‘flaming onion’ fire in his sitting room, shown above.

 

A photo posted by TIBOR (@tiborreich) on

Tibor Reich: Art of Colour and Texture, shown above, was published earlier this month to accompany the exhibition. It can be purchased here (£35.00). The Tibor Reich exhibition runs until August 2016, so you still have lots of time to check it out – it’s well worth it! If you can’t get to Manchester, the University of Leeds (where he studied) have a huge archive of his textile work which can be viewed online.

Wallpaper display at the Whitworth in Manchester | H is for Home

In an adjoining room, there was an exhibition of vintage wallpaper (which runs until the 4th of September 2016). With the room’s huge, tall walls the long rolls were shown off to spectacular effect.

Wallpaper display at the Whitworth in Manchester | H is for Home

Although I loved most of the designs, it also made me realise how overpowering some of the patterns would be if all four walls in a room were papered. A small feature wall would suffice!

Vintage 'Promenade' wallpaper sample | H is for Home

There were display cabinets of wallpaper samples – here are two of my favourites.

Vintage wallpaper sample with birds pattern | H is for Home

Bookmarks: London Underground Maps

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"London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin with a selection of vintage London items such as Kenneth Townsend tiles and London bus jigsaw

We have a real gem for this week’s Bookmarks post – London Underground Maps – Art, Design & Cartography by Claire Dobbin.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing an early map of London Underground

It’s hardly possible to imagine London without its underground system – and equally impossible to imagine this underground system without the classic map which guides its millions of users.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing the timeline and history of the London Underground

This book takes you on its own journey – from 19th century origins to the 21st century future.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing the "M is for Map" page from illustrated alphabet book

Chapter 1 covers the early history and mapping of the London Underground. The first line was opened in 1863 – it was actually steam trains that ran along these early tracks which came as a surprise to us – electric trains being introduced much later, in 1890. Another quick snippet of trivia is that the now ubiquitous term ‘tube’ for the whole of the underground system comes from an early nickname for the Central London Railway which was known as the Two Penny Tube.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing a MacDonald Gill decorative poster map entitled, "By Paying us your Pennies"

The early maps aren’t to be overlooked. There’s some stunning work by artists such as MacDonald ‘Max’ Gill and it also has to be remembered that Harry Beck didn’t start with a blank canvas before producing his famous 1930s design. He took ideas & influences from this earlier mapping such as line diagrams and distinct colours for individual lines.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing Harry Beck's first diagrammatic Tube map at the beginning of chapter two

However, there’s no denying the importance and brilliance of the map originally devised by Beck in 1931 and first published 1933 (there’s a story there too, as it was rejected on its first submission). Chapter 2 charts the map’s development – its geometric design and the abandonment of geographical accuracy.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing Harry Beck's 1948 version of the Tube map

The various versions of Beck’s map are very interesting – its continuous evolution being essential as new stations were built or design tweeks put into practice.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing a poster advertising the Piccadilly Line Extensions

In addition to reproducing the maps, the book also has some great examples of promotional posters and historical photos showing stations, travellers and artwork in situ.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing a poster entitled, "Modern God of Transport"

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing an early photo of the outside of Balham Station

Chapter 3 explores the continuing legacy of Beck’s design and its influence over other transport maps. Also its branding, souvenir value and wider influence over the art world in general.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing a map of New York's subway system

We’ve thoroughly enjoyed this book and can highly recommend it.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing a promotional poster for Tate Gallery using the London Underground map design designed with different coloured tubes of paint

It adds so much background to the subject without ever being dry or unapproachable.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing a humourous cartoon on a London Underground poster - "No need to ask a Pliceman"

…and if you’re one of those people who has to hop on & off the tube regularly, this book will really help you see the places with fresh eyes.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing poster advertising Winter Sales

The book’s launch ties in with the Mind the Map exhibition that opened last week at the London Transport Museum – the author, Louise Dobbin is Senior Curator there. The exhibition, with accompanying events programme, runs until 28 October 2012.

page from "London Underground Maps - Art, Design and Cartography" by Louise Dobbin showing film titles as stops on the London Underground map

As well as Lund Humphries, the book is available from Hive and our UK & US Amazon stores.

[Many thanks to Lund Humphries for the review copy]

Tuesday Huesday: Jacqueline Groag

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vintage 'Aquarius' 1950s fabric designed by Jacqueline Groag from the Designing Women: Post-War British Textiles exhibition at the Fashion and Textile Museum in LondonImage credit: Vintage Seekers

This amazing Aquarius pattern is from a sample of vintage fabric designed by Jacqueline Groag in the 1950s – it’s a design we’ve not seen before.

It forms part of the Designing Women: Post-War British Textiles exhibition currently on at the Fashion and Textile Museum in London (ends 16 June 2012).

The exhibition celebrates the work of, amongst others, Groag (1903-86), Lucienne Day (1917-2010) and Marian Mahler (1911-83).

Prize in the Post

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Bridget Riley exhibition catalogue still in its brown postal envelope

Adelle entered an online competition recently. Up for grabs on the Vintage by Hemingway blog were 3 copies of a Bridget Riley catalogue – and she won!! This is the package that arrived this week.

Bridget Riley exhibition catalogue just taken out of its packaging

The catalogue has been produced to accompany an exhibition of the artist’s work being held at Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge.

letter of congratulations for winning the catalogue from Vintage Wayne Hemingway's return address label

And, taking a quick peek inside, here are a few of Bridget Riley’s classic & influential designs.

page from the Bridget Riley catalogue showing "Shift" page from the Bridget Riley catalogue showing "Movement in Squares"

page from the Bridget Riley catalogue showing "Cornflower" page from the Bridget Riley catalogue showing "Vespertino"

We’ll enjoy reading our copy – thanks to the guys at Vintage by Hemingway!

P.S. – The exhibition has just been extended until 31st December 2011.

Bernard Buffet

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detail from vintage 1968 Bernard Buffet exhibition poster

We’ve been meaning to do a blog post about Bernard Buffet for a long time.

detail from vintage 1968 Bernard Buffet exhibition poster

The recent purchase of this vintage poster brought it to mind once again. We had it sent from France and it advertises an exhibition held in 1969 at the Musée d’Unterlinden in Colmar.

detail from vintage 1968 Bernard Buffet exhibition poster showing gold frame

It’s just come back from our wonderful local framers, Abacus. We chose burnished gold – reminiscent of an antique religious icon.

detail from vintage 1968 Buffet exhibition poster

It now hangs above our bedroom fireplace. We love it!

pile of Ella Fitzgerald LP covers illustrated by Bernard Buffet

We also framed these vinyl album covers that were illustrated by Buffet.

pile of Ella Fitzgerald LP covers illustrated by Bernard Buffet

The set – Ella Fitzgerald sings Gershwin – dates from 1959.

Ella Fitzgerald LP cover of a corner in a room with bed, chair and picture on the wall illustrated by Bernard Buffet

Ella Fitzgerald LP cover of a table with wine bottle, glass and vase of flowers illustrated by Bernard Buffet

Ella Fitzgerald LP cover of a table with alarm clock, paper, envelope and pen illustrated by Bernard Buffet

Ella Fitzgerald LP cover with a woman's face illustrated by Bernard Buffet

Great records and great covers – a perfect combination.

four framed Ella Fitzgerald LP covers illustrated by Bernard Buffet

He’s a fabulous artist – so distinctive – and one of our real favourites. Here’s a link to the online Musée Bernard Buffet

…and here’s a 2-minute, black & white film from 1962 of Buffet and his wife, Annabel in their château and private chapel. We discovered on the British Pathé website – there’s so much beautiful art on the walls!

We’ve set up a Buffet Flickr group – please add your images if you have some or just have a browse!

Festival of Britain

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Original vintage Festival of Britain catalogue | H is for Home

We mentioned buying this Festival of Britain brochure in our last blog – Five Flea Finds.

Costain advert in original 'Festival of Britain' catalogue

We’ve really enjoyed flicking through it.

Electronics information in original 'Festival of Britain' catalogue

Quite a few people have expressed an interest, so we thought we’d share some of its contents with you.

Festival map in original 'Festival of Britain' catalogue

The Festival was held in 1951 – it celebrated the centenary of The Great Exhibition held in 1851 – but was also intended to showcase Britain in the mid twentieth century.

Royal Festival Hall information in original 'Festival of Britain' catalogue

What an exciting event in must have been – with the new wave of optimism after the Second World War.

Battersea Park Fair in original 'Festival of Britain' catalogue

Exhibitions were held around the country, the main site occupying a position on the South Bank in London which was completely redeveloped.

Coalite advert in original 'Festival of Britain' catalogue

The Festival had a great influence on architecture, interior and product design in the years that followed.

Siemens advert in original 'Festival of Britain' catalogue

The brochure contains about 100 pages in total.

Sky page in original 'Festival of Britain' catalogue

It highlights the main attractions – exhibition spaces & their contents, new structures (including the Royal Festival Hall and the famous Skylon), the designers involved etc.

Skylon information in original 'Festival of Britain' catalogue

As is often the case with publications from this era, there are some fantastic advertisements too…

Crompton advert in original 'Festival of Britain' catalogue

…bold, colourful and forward-looking.

Simplex advert in original 'Festival of Britain' catalogue

The brochure is a must have item for Festival of Britain collectors – but also of broader interest to fans of modernism & mid twentieth century design.