Get their look: Vibrant patio garden

Pink vibrant patio gardencredit

This vibrant patio garden may be pink, but don’t think it’s all girlie – there’s a fabulous BBQ installed which would please the most manly of grill masters!

The design makes great use of limited space with numerous spots to sit and separate cooking and dining areas. Again, space is used to the maximum by incorporating the vertical in the planting scheme.

To complete the look, the garden is almost completely white-washed to expand and bounce light around the enclosure. The pink of the seating is picked up in the choice of flowering plants.

  1. Handmade patchwork cushion
  2. Pink floral print cushion cover
  3. The Original Chaise indoor/outdoor beanbag
  4. Gardman Hampton candle lanterns (55cm tall)
  5. Napoleon LE 485 BBQ with side burner
  6. Re-Trouvé outdoor chair by Patricia Urquiola
  7. Re-Trouvé outdoor dining table by Patricia Urquiola

Get their look: Vibrant patio garden | H is for Home

Price Points: Garden arches

Selection of garden arches | H is for Home

Our thoughts have turned to garden arches for this week’s Price Points. A bit random perhaps, but they’ve cropped up in a couple of conversations recently – that’s often a good starting point for this blog series. They’re perfect for climbing flowers or vegetables – clematis, sweet peas, french beans and the like. The ends can go into the ground or into two large pots.

Justin’s parents want one for an access between their driveway to their garden, we thought one would look nice in our garden to add structure – and we also have plenty of space at the allotment. We love mid-range #2 – the action of pushing through gates and passing under an arch to enter our little allotment would make it feel like a grand entrance!

  1. Easy arch 2m x 1.4m black: £9.99, Two Wests & Elliott
  2. Spiral garden arch and gates: £79.99, Amazon
  3. Wrenbury round top arch: £141.00, Taylors Garden Buildings

5 Tips for getting your garden ready for summer

back and side gardencredit

During the winter months, many British gardens can find themselves neglected and look a tad melancholy. Most plants have died back, there have been months of long, dark, cold days where few people feel like venturing out into the garden. There are lots of things you could do in the coming weeks to help get your garden ready for summer.

Raking up leaves in a gardencredit

1. Have a spring clean

Spring is the best time to tackle a bit of garden maintenance. Sweep up, take a bucket of soapy water to garden furniture, check that gates and fences are upright and secure. Does anything need a lick of paint or wood preservative? Is the guttering full of autumn leaves? Is the barbecue rusty?

Garden with wild flower meadowcredit

2. Sow annuals and bulbs

Nothing makes a garden more attractive than colourful, scented, flowering plants. For a quick and easy fix, you can sow annual native wild flower seeds; corncockles and corn marigolds, poppies and buttercups. Bulbs are the gift that keep on giving; they’re low maintenance and the flowers come back year after year. We planted some dolly tubs with mixed bulbs about 18 months ago and they’ve been providing colour and beauty to our garden once again since January this year. We can’t recommend them highly enough.

Collection of colourful garden plant potscredit

3. Re-pot plants that have outgrown their containers

Most plants are dormant in early spring, the ideal time to divide and re-pot plants that have become crowded and pot-bound. Whether you’re after a few new terracotta, metal or plastic containers, you can find a large range of pots, planters and window boxes online. Not only will you get more plants, you’ll be rewarded with stronger, healthier ones that will flower more profusely.

Patio garden with brazier and strings of lights and buntingcredit

4. Decorate

Decorating isn’t just for indoors. There are often large expanses of shabby wall or fence that could be livened up with paint or trellis. Perhaps you’ve got room for a shed, summer house or shepherd’s hut – somewhere to decamp on long hot days. Create a designated al fresco dining space. Put up strings of bunting and fairy lights. Consider sculptures and water features that can bring added interest and focal points to an outside space. Install a couple of gnomes if that’s more to your taste! 🙂

Butterflies on flowers in a gardencredit

5. Don’t forget the wildlife!

Visiting wildlife brings interest to a garden. It’s easy to entice them in – birds, insects, frogs and toads… even the odd hedgehog or two if you’re lucky! Make your garden a welcoming haven; provide food and water stations and places to shelter, nest and spawn. Nectar-rich flowers are loved by all sorts of critters. You’ll soon be rewarded with the buzz of bees, the song of blackbirds and robins, colourful finches and butterflies flitting about – and perhaps some fledglings to watch grow up.

Get their look: Sociable patio space

Sociable patio spacecredit

We’ve had a couple of really lovely sunny days in the past week and we’ve been making the most of them. We’ve tidied up our back garden and planted the first few bulbs and seeds on the allotment.

This sociable patio space is just the type of thing we like. It’s not huge, but the white-painted fence and decking as well as the split level areas makes it appear much larger than it actually is. The patio is cleverly ‘zoned’ with separate places for eating and lounging. The collection of mirrors bounce light around and, along with the artwork, bring the inside out.

  1. Wrought iron garden set
  2. Striped cushion cover
  3. Brass flamingo sculptures
  4. Circular mosaic mirror
  5. Frosted high ball glasses
  6. Poly-rattan garden furniture set

Get their look: sociable patio space | H is for Home

Home Tones: Terracotta

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Armchair in front of a wood-burning stovecredit

This week’s Home Tone is terracotta. We’re sticking with the natural material for our images – whether it be floor tiles, brickwork or pots. This is our favourite use of the colour, particularly when it’s aged or weathered. The baked clay of terracotta comes in various shades from light & chalky to dark orange, but they all tend to have a warm, natural feel. It works really well with creams and greens – and other natural materials such as sea grass and cane – and pale woods such as light oak or beech.

Red brick garden shedcredit

terracotta feature wall and floor in a kitchencredit

Urban roof terrace with red brick feature wall and terracotta planterscredit

Blue painted fitted kitchen with red brick stove alcove and terracotta floorcredit

sitting room with light coloured terracotta floorcredit

fruit trees in giant terracotta pots on a patiocredit

dining room with red brick wall with large painting of wooden spoonscredit

Etsy List: Plant a tree

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'Plant a tree' Etsy List curated by H is for Home

It’s the 30th annual National Tree Week between 28th November and 6th December 2015. The Tree Council (yes, there is such an organisation) launched a campaign in the response to the Dutch Elm Disease crisis of the 60s which destroyed millions of trees. Tree Week grew out of this – and here we are in the 21st century rising to the challenge of Ash Dieback.

Get involved in a community event near you, or simply by gifting a tree or planting one of your own!

Plant a tree
Curated by H is for Home