Posts Tagged ‘glass’

Manchester milk bottles

Sunday, March 8th, 2015

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collection of vintage milk bottles from Greater Manchester | H is for Home

We bought this small group of vintage milk bottles last week.

collection of vintage milk bottles from Greater Manchester | H is for Home

They’re half pints and date from the 1920s/30s kind of era – they’re very sweet!

vintage milk bottle from Sale in Greater Manchester | H is for Home

The bottle markings are interesting – each from a different local dairy.

vintage milk bottle from Salford in Greater Manchester | H is for Home

These are all from Greater Manchester. The area would have had large numbers of dairies at one time – supplying households, local shops, businesses & schools. They’d be situated in the various districts & suburbs. This group of ten contains bottles from Salford, Stretford, Sale and Moss Side. The bottles have relatively wide necks and make lovely little vases for a spray of flowers. 

vintage milk bottle from Stretford in Greater Manchester | H is for Home

They’re available from our shop singly at £6 each; perhaps you’ve got a small restaurant or café with about ten tables – they’d be just perfect for that – or a vintage-inspired wedding reception perhaps?

Gimme Five! Red wine glasses

Friday, September 19th, 2014

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selection of 5 types of red wine glasses

Well, it was on the cards for quite a while. We were down to our last two red wine glasses when one got broken whilst taking it out of the cupboard.

We found a set of four in a local charity shop about two years ago. They were really cheap – £2.50 the lot – but they were great quality and each held almost an entire bottle! They’re quite fragile, they make that lovely, lead crystal ringing sound when flicked gently with a fingernail.

Sadly, one by one, they were getting broken. We’ve been trying to be so, so very careful when using them and washing them up. We’ve been down to the last pair for almost a year, but we knew that it was only a matter of time… a split second of lost concentration…

The chances of us finding another great set like that in a charity shop are slim. We’re probably going to have to shell out properly for replacements. But what should we do? We can get a six-pack of cheap & cheerful ones from IKEA for just £1.25. That’s probably a good decision considering our track record! But the lovely ones from John Lewis hold ¾ of a litre – no topping up needed – decisions, decisions!

  1. Connoisseur red wine glasses, 0.66L, set of 4: £38, John Lewis
  2. SVALKA red wine glasses (30 cl) : £1.25 /6-pack, IKEA
  3. Set Of 4 red wine glasses: £45, Le Creuset
  4. Dartington crystalline set of six large red wine glasses (57cl): £24, Selfridges
  5. Vienna set of 6 burgundy glasses (57cl): £30, Habitat

Creative Collections: Glass floats

Tuesday, September 16th, 2014

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collection of vintage glass floats

We’ve chosen glass fishing floats for this week’s Creative Collections post – we love the subtle colour variations and irregularities in shape.

collection of vintage glass floats

Glass floats originated in Norway in about 1840. Christopher Faye, a Norwegian merchant, in collaboration with the Hadelands Glass Works, is credited with their invention. Early examples were hand blown, later the glass was injected into wooden moulds resulting in the faint seam line which can be seen on many examples. Modern replicas are also being produced.

collection of vintage glass floats

This is how they would have originally been used – encased with a twine netting holder. These would have then been attached to the large fishing nets & lines to keep mile after mile of them afloat in the sea. This is quite a basic form of holder, but the more elaborate antique examples crafted by the fishermen or their wives during long winter evenings can be a things of real beauty. Glass floats are no longer used having been replaced by plastic, aluminium or Styrofoam. However, thousands of the glass ones are still afloat, travelling along in the currents of the world’s oceans. They’re prized by beachcombers and used in interior decoration.

collection of vintage glass floats

They’re great for interior display – particularly the genuine older examples which have so much character. A collection looks great in a large bowl for example – and they look really fabulous on a window sill where the sun catches the glass and fills the room with coloured light and shadows.