Home Tones: Racing Green

Racing green bookshelvescredit

Racing green is a quintessential British colour. It’s the colour of rubber Wellington boots and Barbour jackets. It’s a favoured paint colour of the Land Rover, Jaguar, Mini and the vintage Morris Minor.

In houses, it’s a great transition colour for bringing the outside in and vice versa. It works well with other shades of green, yellows and various wood tones – and when contrasted against shades of cream & white.

Racing green coloured floor to ceiling folding doors out on to a gardencredit

Racing green coloured conservatorycredit

Vignette in front of a racing green painted wallcredit

Bay window painted in racing greencredit

Coastal house painted racing green & whitecredit

Boy's bedroom decorated in shades of blue with racing green bed headcredit

Built-in kitchen with racing green coloured shelf alcovecredit

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Home Tones: Emerald

Dark-painted living room with emerald velvet upholstered easy chaircredit

Like Malachite, which we featured on Home Tones a few weeks ago, emerald is a beautiful green coloured mineral much favoured during the Art Deco era.

Emerald jewellery looks fabulous with diamonds and set in platinum or white gold. Similarly, in interiors, match this shade of green with brilliant white, metallics and a deep dark shade of grey.

Emerald green can give a feeling of grandeur, mystery or freshness. It all depends on what you pair it with and what type of materials you use. For instance, the velvet easy chair above makes the room ooze plushness and sophistication.

Cloakroom with emerald subway tiles and patterned wallpapercredit

Mantlepiece decorated with emerald coloured glass, picture frames and coral-based lampcredit

Corner of Mini Moderns' home with white & emerald patterned wallpaper and emerald desk lampcredit

Emerald & white patterned cushions and curtain in a sitting roomcredit

Emerald painted bathroom with roll top bath and black and white checkerboard tiled floorcredit

Black, white & emerald painted stairscredit

Emerald & gold mosaic tiled bathroomcredit

Home Tones: Malachite

Malachite kitchen wall splash backcredit

Malachite is a naturally occurring mineral from which copper is smelted. It has been in use for thousands of years, often being ground into a powder and used as a pigment in paint, although this powder has now been replaced with verditer, a synthetic substitute. The mineral itself and malachite paint effects can still be used with stunning results.

It had its heyday, especially in Russia, during the 18th & 19 centuries when it was used in decorative objects and again in the Art Deco era when it was regularly used in jewellery.

Used across a large expanse such as in the bathroom pictured below, it creates a bold, dramatic effect. If you don’t feel that adventurous, you can use it in small quantities as done in the images of the bathroom taps, wall tiles and printed chair upholstery, curtains and cushions.

Bathroom with malachite wall tiles, concrete bath and black chandeliercredit

Shoe & handbag cabinet with glass shelves and lined with malachitecredit

Silver coloured bath taps inset with malachitecredit

Sitting room with white painted walls and malachite patterned curtainscredit

Malachite bathroom tilescredit

Eclectic sitting room with malachite print cushions on an L-shaped sofacredit

Double bedroom with malachite printed sliding doors on a built-in wardrobecredit

Home Tones: Yeabridge Green

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Farrow & Ball Yeabridge Green painted door with Salon Drab painted wallscredit

Last month, Farrow & Ball launched 9 new colours to their paint collection. Shadow White, Drop Cloth, Worsted, Cromarty, Peignoir, Vardo, Inchyra Blue, Salon Drab and Yeabridge Green. There are some fabulous colours in the list, but we’ve plumped for the last named as our choice for this week’s Home Tones. We’re big fans of green and this is a very distinctive shade. It has a chalky, matte quality. We’ve seen lots of examples of it paired with pinks and blues which work well – particularly those vibrant peacock and kingfisher-like shades. We love it alongside browns, from chocolate to chestnut, as in the main image above.

Sitting room painted with Farrow & Ball's Yeabridge Green

Wall painted in Farrow & Ball's Yeabridge Green

Bedroom with Yeabridge Green walls decorated as part of the BBC's Great British Interior Design Challengecredit

Little girl's bedroom painted with Yeabridge Green wallscredit

 

A photo posted by heather clawson (@habituallychic) on

 

A photo posted by Mark Homewood (@mark_homewood) on

 

A photo posted by Antony Westover (@antonynoel64) on

Home Tones: Army green

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Bathroom decorated with Little Greene Reverie Jungle wallpaper and army green roll top bathcredit

This week’s Home Tone is army green. We’ve chosen one image of a bedroom with disguise netting on the bunk beds, but it doesn’t have to be reserved for camouflage effects! It’s a very restful colour which combines really well with wood and other natural materials such as wicker, bamboo and sea grass. It looks fabulous against a strong contrasting white, tangerine orange or purple. And it also provides the perfect backdrop for dark green foliage or more acid green shades.

wood-clad house with army green & purple window trimcredit

Boys' bedroom decorated with army green camouflaged bunk bedscredit

Army green painted front doorcredit

Army green painted double aspect bedroomcredit

corner of a sitting room with army green leather club chaircredit

Bedroom with army green wall, bedding and headboardcredit

Army green panelled sitting roomcredit

Home Tones: Green Flash

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cottage entrance with green flash front door

credit

Whatever happens in the fashion world filters down into the interiors world. The following is what Pantone had to say about Green Flash, one of the top 10 fashion colours they picked for spring 2016.

Green Flash calls on its wearer to explore, push the envelope and escape the mundane, radiating an openness that combines with the rest of the palette in unexpected but serendipitous ways. The popularity of this brilliant hue is representative of nature’s persistent influence even in urban environments, a trend continuing to inspire designers.

Perhaps not the easiest colour to use (nor wear for that matter), but it is very striking when successful. It’s fresh & clean so perfect for bathrooms – and also looks great near large windows where it helps bring the outdoors in. The ideal partner is a crisp, contrasting brilliant white.

modern kitchen with green flash splashbackcredit

white chest of drawers in front of a green flash painted wallcredit

Kid's bedroom with green flash painted wallcredit

kitchen diner with green flash coloured tile splashback and feature wallcredit

shower room with green flash pained and tiled walls and ceilingcredit

green flash painted porch and wooden railingscredit

bedroom bay window with green flash painted wallscredit