Designer Desire: Evelyn Ackerman

Mosaic of Evelyn Ackerman artworks | H is for Home

Alongside her husband Jerome, Evelyn Ackerman (1924-2012) was a leading light in California mid-century modernism. They were contemporaries of the likes of Alexander Girard and fellow married couple, Ray and Charles Eames.

She worked across a variety of mediums including mosaic, textile tapestry, metalwork and enamelware, stone casting and wood carving. They designed, produced and sold their work through their companies Jenev and ERA Industries.

Although mostly available in the United States (as expected), her work can occasionally be found on Etsy and eBay.

Jerome & Evelyn Ackerman in their homecredit

Hand-in-Hand book by Jerome and Evelyn Ackerman
Hand-in-Hand: Ceramics, mosaics, tapestries, wood carvings and hardware by the California Mid-Century designers

Image credits:

1st Dibs | Artnet | Invaluable

Designer Desire: Philippe Starck

Mosaic of Philippe Starck designs | H is for Home

Philippe Starck is probably best known for his ‘Juicy Salif’ metal citrus squeezer or polycarbonate ‘Ghost’ chairs. However, he’s such a prolific designer – he has turned his talents to such an array of products. He has designed motorbikes and cars, clocks and wristwatches, restaurants and hotels, mineral water bottles and bottles of Champagne, spectacles and shoes. Is there anything he hasn’t designed?!

He has worked with many leading design houses including Kartell, Alessi, Driade and Vitra. He has designed a smart thermostat for Netatmo, a hard drive for LaCie and even a micro wind turbine for Pramac.

Starck considers himself:

A Japanese architect, an American art director, a German industrial designer, a French artistic director, an Italian furniture designer.

Many of his designs are always available online – with prices from under £10 for a fly swatter to almost £10,000 for an illuminated room divider. Check out  Amazon, Etsy and 1stDibs.

Philippe Starck on a 'Pibal' scooter-cycle he designed in collaboration with Peugeotcredit

 

Designer Desire: Dieter Rams

Dieter Rams designs | H is for Home

Earlier this week, we featured a book-filled sitting room that contained a Vitsoe 606 Universal Shelving System. Today, we’re featuring it’s designer, Dieter Rams.

Born in 1932 in Germany, Dieter Rams is considered the king of industrial design. Yes, he has designed his fair share of furniture, but it is his everyday electric and electronic items for which he is best known. He  makes the mundane and practical, beautiful and desirable. Alarm clocks, men’s electric shavers, calculators, radios and heaters have all received the Rams treatment.

He designed for Braun for many years; his products are pared back, unfussy and, most of all, thoroughly usable.

Portrait of Dieter Rams with some of his many designs

Image credits:

1st Dibs | eBay | Etsy

Vintage hospital trolley

Vintage stainless steel hospital trolley | H is for Home

We bought this vintage hospital trolley at auction last week.

Vintage hospital trolley | H is for Home

We thought it had great re-purpose potential. In particular, its suitability to make a fabulous kitchen work station. For starters, it’s made from stainless steel which is hygienic and easy to keep clean. There’s an ideal height work surface for chopping, peeling etc; an under-shelf for storage where you could keep boards, baskets, boxes or jars – and the drawers are perfect for knives or other utensils.

Open drawer showing chef's knives on a vintage hospital trolley | H is for Home

Also, the trolley is on wheels – so easy to move around the kitchen for cleaning behind or positioning in the best light for working.

Wheel on a vintage hospital trolley | H is for Home

It’s manufactured by Reynolds & Branson of Leeds and is very robust. We’d say it dates from the 1950s/60s era. The overall condition is very good with clean, undamaged stainless steel. There’s age-related wear to the wheel area, but we actually like a bit of this type of aged patina in places… and we love the flash of yellow too. If you like it and are able to collect, it’s heading to our antiques centre space this week with a price tag of £135.

Another angle

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Classic vintage black 1227 Anglepoise lamp

Our last post featured an interesting ‘industrial design’ coffee pot / percolator. It’s still unidentified!

original vintage 1950s black 1227 Anglepoise lamp

Here’s another great example of industrial design… bought at auction last week. Unlike the coffee pot, we know a lot about this item.

detail from original vintage 1950s Anglepoise 1227 lamp detail from original vintage 1950s Anglepoise 1227 lamp

It’s a classic Anglepoise lamp designed by George Carwardine. This is the ‘1227’ model licensed to Herbert Terry & Sons – the ‘2-tiered base’ version produced from 1938 until 1969.
detail of base of original vintage 1950s Anglepoise 1227 lamp

This is a fantastic early example with original paint finish, wiring and Bakelite switch. In superb condition and still fully working.

manufacturer detail from original vintage 1950s Anglepoise 1227 lamp

A design classic indeed – here’s a more detailed history from the Design Museum. and a newspaper article from 2009 about its reissue.

Designed by?

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vintage stainless steel coffee percolator

We need a little help – who designed this?

detail from vintage industrial designed steel coffee percolator

We bought this really interesting vintage coffee percolator at a market last week.

detail from vintage industrial designed steel coffee percolator

We think it’s a very good example of domestic industrial design.

detail from vintage industrial designed steel coffee percolator

It probably dates from between the 1920s and the 1940s…

detail from vintage industrial designed steel coffee percolator

detail from vintage industrial designed steel coffee percolator

It’s made from steel with Bakelite finials.

detail from vintage industrial designed steel coffee percolator

It gives us a few clues – such as registered design marks – and the number ’37’ to the base.

detail from vintage industrial designed steel coffee percolator

It’s very reminiscent of Naum Slutky and Bauhaus design… have you got any thoughts?