Haw ketchup

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bottle of home-made haw ketchup with pair of small cacti in food tins

The hawthorn, or Crataegus Monogyna, is one of the latest fruiting shrubs of the year. They’re an important source of food for winter visiting birds such as redwings, fieldfares waxwings.

 aluminium colander containing haw berries

I’m sure they didn’t mind sharing just a few with us so we could make a couple of bottles of haw ketchup!

bottle of home-made haw ketchup with pair of small cacti in food tins

Some people are a bit wary of picking wild, red berries; they’re worried about whether they could be poisonous. I took a photo of the shrub to help with identification!

hawthorn bush

If you’re still unsure, here’s a close up of the berries and their leaves. The recipe we used is from Pam Corbin, aka ‘Pam the Jam’. She’s patron of The Guild of Jam and Preserve Makers, but she’s probably best known as a regular on Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s TV programmes and penning the books on preserves and cakes from his River Cottage Handbook series.

Haw ketchup

Yield: Makes 1 x 330ml/12 fl oz bottle

Haw ketchup

Ingredients

  • 500g/18oz haw berries
  • 300ml/10½ floz cider vinegar
  • 300ml/10½ fl oz water
  • 170g/6oz granulated sugar
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
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Instructions

  1. Wash a bottle with a vinegar-proof screw-top or stopper before putting them into an oven at 130°C/275°F/Gas mark 1. Alternatively, put both the bottle & screw-top/stopper in a large saucepan and fill with enough water to cover the bottle completely. Bring to a boil and simmer for at least 15 minutes
  2. Rinse the berries in a large sieve or colander and remove any stalks and leaves
  3. Put them in a saucepan with the vinegar and water
  4. Bring the mixture to a boil, lower the heat and simmer for 30 minutes, by which time the berries will have turned a dull brown and their skins will have split to reveal their yellow flesh
  5. Tip into a sieve over a clean pan and rub the fruit through with a spoon, leaving the skins and pips behind
  6. Add the sugar to the purée in the pan and heat gently, stirring until it dissolves
  7. Bring to a boil and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring often to ensure it doesn't catch
  8. Funnel the hot sauce into the hot, clean bottle and seal straight away

Notes

This sauce improves with age, so you can leave it for a few weeks before opening. Use within a year and refrigerate once open

http://hisforhomeblog.com/food/haw-ketchup/

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Spiced apple chutney

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home-made spiced apple chutney | H is for Home

There were still LOADS of apples left over after making an apple & blackberry pie a few weeks ago. I hate wasting food so had to do something with them. “I’ll make apple chutney!”, I thought.

vintage red wire bucket of apples

My Cordon Bleu Preserving book contains recipes for 4 different versions of apple chutney however it was the spiced one that took my fancy (for this read, “It was the one where I already had all the ingredients in the house.”) This recipe makes a humongous amount of chutney, but it’s easily adapted if you don’t have that much fruit to preserve. It’s a steeper, the flavours mellow if the chutney is left a week or so before consuming. So far, we’ve discovered that it makes a delicious accompaniment to a cheeseboard. It really suits a creamy brie and sharp cheddar – not so much blue cheese. I’m vegetarian, but I’ve had it on good advice that it’s also very good with pork pie (Justin) and sausage rolls (Duncan). What do you recommend?

vintage plate with a slice of pork pie, pea shoots and dollop of home made spiced apple chutney

Spiced apple chutney

Spiced apple chutney

Ingredients

  • 36 large apples - peeled, cored & sliced
  • 1½lbs/680g sultanas
  • 3lbs/1.4kg demerara sugar
  • 4oz/115g mustard seeds
  • 2 fresh chillies, sliced into rings
  • 2 rounded tsps ground turmeric
  • 2oz/60g ground ginger
  • 1½lbs/680g onions, halved & thinly sliced
  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled & crushed with salt
  • 2pts/1L vinegar (I used distilled white vinegar, but you can used ordinary malt vinegar)

Instructions

  1. Put all the ingredients into a large pan (a jam pan is ideal) and simmer for 1½-2 hours until very soft and pulpy
  2. Turn into sterilised jars and cover

Notes

A few tips for making successful chutneys, relishes & ketchups:

-1- Once opened a jar must be refrigerated and consumed within a week.

-2- Don't allow the vinegar to come into contact with with metal whilst in store.

-3- When preserving with vinegar, don't use copper or brass preserving pans. Use aluminium or stainless steel and only use enamelled iron pans if there are no chips to the enamel.

-4- It's important to cook chutneys and sauces thoroughly otherwise they will not keep.

http://hisforhomeblog.com/food/spiced-apple-chutney/