Designer Desire: Jacob Hull

Mosaic of Jacob Hull jewellery designs | H is for Home

This Christmas, my top Christmas present was an amazing, vintage, brutalist choker that Justin gave me (It’s pictured bottom, left in the image above). It’s silver with a tiger eye centrepiece – and it’s HUGE!

It was designed by Jacob Hull, a Danish sculptor and jewellery designer active from the 1970s who worked for Buch & Diechmann and under his own name. He worked primarily in silver and gold plate decorated with semi-precious stones and glass.

Despite my best efforts, I couldn’t find out much about him on the internet, the portrait of him below is the only one I came across.

eBay and Etsy are two places to begin your search if you’ve fallen in love with his jewellery like I have.

Portrait of Jacob Hullcredit

Additional image credits:

1st Dibs

Christmas greetings to our friends

Image taken from "No Ordinary Child" children's book (©1971) by Peggy Blakeley with illustrations by Edith WittImage taken from “No Ordinary Child” children’s book (©1971) by Peggy Blakeley with illustrations by Edith Witt

Wishing all our readers and subscribers a very merry Christmas and happy & prosperous 2018.

Warm regards,

Justin and Adelle signatures

Designer Desire: Enzo Mari

Mosaic of Enzo Mari designs | H is for Home

Enzo Mari is an Italian product designer who is, in our opinion, under-valued and -appreciated. He’s a life-long communist and infamous firebrand known for his staunch views on design and life in general. “Design is dead” and “form is everything” are statements made during his regular outbursts.

He states that during his design process he’s more interested in pleasing the factory worker than the consumer. Evidence of this can be seen in his 1973 Proposta per un’autoprogettazione – a manual for creating a collection of basic, DIY furniture simply using plain planks of wood and nails.

He’s produced designs for brands such as Driade, Poltronova, Alessi, KPM Berlin and, most famously, Danese Milano. It was only when researching Mari that I discovered he designed the ‘Mama’ range for Le Creuset in 1972.

Many of his designs are still in production and are available from Houzz and Made in Design, Vintage and discontinued examples are for sale at Connox, Ebay, Etsy and Pomono.

Portrait of Enzo Maricredit

Additional image credits:

1st Dibs

Some new feathered friends

Vintage Cadburys Bournville birds tin | H is for Home

We found our first example of this tin 10 years ago – and we loved it so much that we couldn’t part with it!

Vintage Cadburys Bournville birds tin | H is for Home Vintage Cadburys Bournville birds tin | H is for Home

Well, some new lovely feathered friends have arrived.

Vintage Cadburys Bournville birds tin | H is for Home

We picked up another one of these gorgeous tins produced for Cadbury in the 1960s. If there’s anyone out there who loves it as much as us, you’ll be pleased to know that this one is for sale. The bird illustrations are fabulous. They remind us very much of the work of Charley Harper.

Vintage Cadburys Bournville birds tin with tea and biscuits | H is for Home

We find vintage tins both decorative and useful. There are an endless number of products that can be stored in a good tin. Our own version is used to house biscuits and cakes – so obviously used on a regular basis!

Designer Desire: Kaj Franck

Mosaic of Kaj Franck designs | H is for Home

What? We’ve never featured Kaj Franck on Designer Desire before? How did that happen?!

We have some of his designs in our home and in our shop. So far, we own a ‘Muki’ mug decorated with Raija Uosikkinen’s ‘Lintu’ pattern and a large ‘Kulho’ bowl with Esteri Tomula’s ‘Tatti’ mushrooms pattern (6th from top, on the left).

The one design on his wares that I really, really desire is ‘Sydän’, the red hearts on white enamelware range (3rd from top, on the right). This pattern was designed by Gunvor Olin-Grönqvist. I’ve seen it on bowls, plates, kettles, jugs and mugs – but the condition and price has never been right.

Kaj Franck (1911-1989) was one of the leading modernist Finnish designers working in glass, ceramics, enamel and metalware. He was artistic director at Arabia (now Iittala) and produced many of their designs as well as ones for their subsidiary company, Finel. He also designed many pieces for glassware company, Notsjö Nuutajärvi.

After researching Franck’s back catalogue, we realised that there’s a similar scenario to the design collaboration between Cathrineholm designers Grete Prytz Kittelsen and Arne Clausen. One person designed the vessel (which was Franck’s domain) and others, such as Esteri Tomula and Raija Uosikkinen, produced the applied pattern.

Some of his popular ranges – such as Teema crockery, Scandia Cutlery and Kartio glassware – are still being manufactured and are available from the Scandinavian Design Center and Finnish Design Shop. I prefer his more colourful, more interesting vintage designs which are always available on eBay, Etsy, Pamono and Bukowskis.

There’s a book on Franck that I’d love to buy, or failing that, have a flick through entitled Kaj Franck – Muotoilija / Formgivare / Designer, currently on sale at around the £100 mark.

Portrait of Kaj Franckcredit

Additional image credits:
1st Dibs | Bukowskis

Iden seek!

Three pieces of vintage Iden pottery | H is for Home

We love a bit of Iden Pottery – the subtle colours, interesting patterns and tactile surfaces. You may need to be a bit selective however, some of the early hand made studio ware is gorgeous.

Vintage Iden Pottery lamp base | H is for Home

We bought this fabulous lamp base a while ago, but still haven’t married it up with a suitable shade. We’ve been keeping an eye out for a cream or beige Hessian shade but alas, nothing of the right size or shape has appeared on our travels. We need to make a more determined effort – perhaps an internet trawl is required. It’s such a shame to leave this lovely piece languishing in a storage box.

Detail from vintage Iden Pottery mug | H is for Home Detail from vintage Iden Pottery lamp base | H is for Home Detail from vintage Iden Pottery vase | H is for Home

Iden Pottery was founded by Dennis Townsend when he left Rye Pottery in 1959. The wares were sold by Harrod’s and Heal’s and are well regarded for their quality of design and finish. Their pared back subtlety means that they don’t scream at you from a distance – so keep your eyes peeled for hidden gems on flea market stalls or charity shop shelves.

Vintage Iden Pottery base stamp | H is for Home

Larger objects such as the lamp base work well as stand alone pieces in a variety of interior styles. We like grouping smaller pieces in groups alongside other pieces of Iden – or as part of a general collection of studio pottery from the same era.