Charity Vintage: Pelican Books | British birds, wild plants & flowers

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Vintage Collection of Pelican Books on bird watching and wild plants & flowers for sale by & in support of Dorothy House Foundation(ends 24 May, 2015 16:32:25 BST)

Yesterday we highlighted a range of bird-watching handbooks to help you identify some of our avian friends. Lo & behold we found this great lot available on eBay for Charity. We love vintage Penguin and Pelican Books anyway, but this lot covers everything you need for doing a bit of nature-spotting!

There are four books on bird identification, and the other four classify wild flowers, herbs and grasses. The set is for sale by Dorothy House Foundation*. The opening bid is £5 with £3 on top for postage and packaging. That’s a pound a book – bargain!

*Dorothy House Foundation aims to work with their community to develop, influence and provide palliative and end of life care that meets the needs of all people with a life-limiting illness. Their purpose is to ensure that the very best care is provided to those in need.


Etsy List: If you go down to the woods today…

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'If you go down to the woods today' Etsy List by H is for HomeWe love walking Fudge in the woods near our house – it takes on such a magical quality in the autumn.

The colour; the earthy smell; the sound of crisp, dry leaves underfoot; squirrels darting here & there up trunks and between branches; mushrooms poking up through the leaf litter.

Yesterday, I (Adelle) was lucky to get a long look at two startled deer leaping away – it was the first time I’d seen deer in over a year. Justin boasts of sightings at least once a week!

If you go down to the woods today…
Curated by H is for Home


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Gardening for Wildlife

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Cottage garden with borders, paths and shed

Image credit: Kellan

Nothing beats sitting in your garden on a sunny afternoon, listening to the birds sing and watching other little wild creatures shuffle in and out of your garden. To encourage more wildlife info your garden, there are lots of tips and tricks you can implement so your garden is even more welcoming.

Starlings eating on a bird tableImage credit: pjs2005

Bird Tables

Having a bird table is a wonderful addition to a garden: you’ll have so many different bird species fluttering in and out of your garden throughout the year. There are many different types, from free standing bird tables, through wall mounted, ground feeding and small ones hanging from trees or fences. Place yours in front of a window so you can watch the birds even when the weather is chilly, and keep it stocked up with bird feed throughout the year to ensure you have your fair share of feathered visitors.

detailed view of a log pileImage credit: Martin Bamford

Log Pile

Piles of logs not only allow your wood to dry out for the best log fires in your fireplace, but they also allow biodiversity to thrive. It’s a great location for growing different mosses, and encouraging small mammals, insects and amphibians. Build it in a pyramid shape if you’d like to attract hedgehogs too, but never set it alight without checking for wildlife.

frog popping its head out of a pondImage credit: Dan Zen

Pond Life

Ponds are great for wildlife, and they’re really easy to construct. Make sure the edges are shallow: that’ll allow easy access for little creatures like frogs and newts. Install plants around the edges to shelter the pond life, and keep it clean with pond cleaners that aren’t made with too many chemicals.

Virginia creeper growing on a wooden fenceImage credit: Laura Bernhardt

Plants

Climbing plants are not only beautiful, but they also provide excellent nesting habitats. There are lots to choose from but good ones are roses, honeysuckle and clematis. If you have a bit more space, plant a hawthorn hedge, blackthorn or hazel: the hedge will provide nesting sites along with nuts and berries for wildlife during the harsh winter months.

Bee on lavenderImage credit: Alden Chadwick

Flowers

Encourage bees with pollen and nectar-producing plants like lavender. The Royal Horticultural Society can advise on the best plants, and you can also provide a dry nesting box for bees: one with a see-through window would allow you to watch them at work!

The garden is an amazing place for wildlife if you can create the perfect environment. With just a few easy steps you’ll have a garden bustling with life!

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Gimme Five! Hibernation homes

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selection of 5 hibernation homes for garden wildlife

The weather has turned positively autumnal this week – and August Bank Holiday weekend isn’t even upon us yet! We’ve been seeing squirrels scurrying about busily collecting supplies for later in the year.

We regularly feed the avian visitors to our garden, especially hanging seeds and lard balls in the trees during the lean winter months. This year, we plan on doing a little bit extra. Erecting insect, bat and hedgehog hibernation homes will make our garden a veritable wildlife boarding house – the kind of lodgers we’d love to welcome! There are so many types of homes and shelters to choose from out there. And so many different creatures that you can encourage to over-winter and stay on year-round.

  1. Butterfly biome: £24.99, RSPB
  2. Wooden hedgehog house – £99.95, Notonthehighstreet
  3. The Birds and the Bees: £34.95, Etsy
  4. Double chamber bat box: £28.95, Ethical Superstore
  5. Ladybird house – £9.99, Crocus