Expanding your homeowner skill set, one step at a time

Expanding your homeowner skill set, one step at a time

It’s a satisfying feeling when you become a homeowner. You have your own space, your own property, your own investment to look after. Success or failure, it all comes down to your own planning and effort. Or at least, that’s how it’s supposed to be.

Yet, living as a homeowner is also a skill. While renting is surely not as financially stable as owning your own place (paying someone else’s mortgage instead of your own is, of course, less ideal), it gives peace of mind when a landlord or property agent is fully responsible for any maintenance issues that materialise. As a homeowner, you will need to learn all this for yourself, or pay for someone else to do it out of your own pocket.

In this post, then, we hope to simplify that approach. Let’s consider some of the vital knowledge you should add to your homeowner skill set.

Develop your painting techniques

Painting may not be a task that needs to be carried out on a regular basis, but it’s an easy and elementary skill to learn. Carrying out a quality paint job can quickly freshen up a room and transform the décor, and it’s a simple method for changing up the visual profile of a space without shelling out too much cash. Learning to strip wallpaper, prime walls and skirting, cut in and effectively (and neatly) apply paint with a roller and brush is a worthwhile effort.

Invest in a complete toolbox

You can never tell when you’ll need to carry out the array of DIY household tasks that could arise. For that reason, it’s a good idea to start compiling a toolbox with high-quality basics like screwdrivers, wrenches, a hammer, pliers, a drill, a spirit level and a tape measure, at the very least. You can buy tools from reputable retailers and make sure every job is covered. From that point on, you’ll at least have the means to carry out most basic DIY jobs. From then on, all you’ll need to consider will be your technique, which will develop with time and practice.

Understand how to manage damp

If you live in an old house in a temperate or cold climate, damp is an issue you’ll likely encounter. Ultimately, it’s about managing moisture build-up in your home, and not letting it linger on walls and windows to the point where it becomes a problem. You’ll recognise what damp smells like when you first experience it; a musty, mushroomy odour that feels unhealthy to inhale. That’s because it is; often, mould can lead to toxic spores that can damage your airways and cause illness. Using anti-mould spray, inspecting walls and woodwork for rot, ventilating your home correctly and using dehumidifiers to counter the moist conditions is a necessity. If you can get a handle on how to recognise and deal with damp, you can resolve a good deal of preventable DIY repair issues.

With this useful advice, you’ll be certain to start expanding your homeowner skill set one step at a time. Before too long, a possible repair will inspire you to action, instead of it feeling like an overwhelming burden.

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3 signs you need to replace a window in your property

3 signs you need to replace a window in your property

Windows can be one of the last things we think about when it comes to regulating the temperature in our homes. Often, a sign they’re on their way out is loss of heat – your home (and you) will feel colder as a result and your energy bills could be sky-high. Let’s look at 4 reasons it might be time to replace a window at home.

They’re difficult to open and close

There’s one major reason to replace a window, and that’s if you can’t open or close it any more. Why? You’ve lost an essential escape route should you need it, if there’s an emergency. If you don’t want to invest too much money, think about utilising electric window openers instead. They can be a cost-effective and safe solution.

Windows can become difficult to open for a few reasons. The first is that it might be painted shut – especially if it’s an old single-glazed affair. Other reasons might be down to a warped frame  – prevalent on uPVC windows, which can expand and contract in hot weather. It may be time to look at opting for a new installation in this case.

They’re completely worn out

There are certain signs your windows are worn out, such as rotten wood, warping or failed double-glazing units (you’ll recognise this if it looks like the inside of the panels is misted up). These are all huge indicators that they need to be replaced.

Once rot sets into a wooden frame, it’s nearly impossible to keep it in good condition. Rainwater will often be let in and then cause more decay.

Sometimes, lesser quality uPVC windows end up discoloured over time – and couple this with expansion due to heat and possible misting of glazing, and you’ll soon realise they need to be replaced – you may also notice:

  • water leaks
  • condensation
  • cracks
  • chips
  • holes
  • scratches

If your windows are starting to fail.

Draughty windows

Tina Turner never turned those into a song, but often when a window needs to be replaced, you’ll notice more in the way of drafts and cold air coming into your home. This might increase your energy bills considerably – as much as 25% in some cases.

Drafts happen when a window won’t shut properly or if the locking mechanism is not working any more, this can cause issues too. Whilst it’s not energy bill friendly, it can also cause potential security issues too – with burglars possibly finding an easy way in if a window can be forced.

Windows are letting water in

Whilst windows are essential to let the light in, you want to keep the moisture out as that can spell disaster. Damp that gets in between double glazing panes can cause issues in and around the window and frame – not to mention causing dampness on walls too. Of course, condensation can be wiped away quickly, but once it starts to build up you’re storing up a lot of problems with water ingress and mould that can then require a lot more home maintenance over time. It might be best to take out and replace the window completely and undertake remedial work on the water damage before it gets too bad.

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Expanding your homeowner skill set, one step at a time

Expanding your homeowner skill set, one step at a time

It’s a satisfying feeling when you become a homeowner. You have your own space, your own property, your own investment to look after. Success or failure, it all comes down to your own planning and effort. Or at least, that’s how it’s supposed to be.

Yet, living as a homeowner is also a skill. While renting is surely not as financially stable as owning your own place (paying someone else’s mortgage instead of your own is, of course, less ideal), it gives peace of mind when a landlord or property agent is fully responsible for any maintenance issues that materialise. As a homeowner, you will need to learn all this for yourself, or pay for someone else to do it out of your own pocket.

In this post, then, we hope to simplify that approach. Let’s consider some of the vital knowledge you should add to your homeowner skill set.

Develop your painting techniques

Painting may not be a task that needs to be carried out on a regular basis, but it’s an easy and elementary skill to learn. Carrying out a quality paint job can quickly freshen up a room and transform the décor, and it’s a simple method for changing up the visual profile of a space without shelling out too much cash. Learning to strip wallpaper, prime walls and skirting, cut in and effectively (and neatly) apply paint with a roller and brush is a worthwhile effort.

Invest in a complete toolbox

You can never tell when you’ll need to carry out the array of DIY household tasks that could arise. For that reason, it’s a good idea to start compiling a toolbox with high-quality basics like screwdrivers, wrenches, a hammer, pliers, a drill, a spirit level and a tape measure, at the very least. You can buy tools from reputable retailers and make sure every job is covered. From that point on, you’ll at least have the means to carry out most basic DIY jobs. From then on, all you’ll need to consider will be your technique, which will develop with time and practice.

Understand how to manage damp

If you live in an old house in a temperate or cold climate, damp is an issue you’ll likely encounter. Ultimately, it’s about managing moisture build-up in your home, and not letting it linger on walls and windows to the point where it becomes a problem. You’ll recognise what damp smells like when you first experience it; a musty, mushroomy odour that feels unhealthy to inhale. That’s because it is; often, mould can lead to toxic spores that can damage your airways and cause illness. Using anti-mould spray, inspecting walls and woodwork for rot, ventilating your home correctly and using dehumidifiers to counter the moist conditions is a necessity. If you can get a handle on how to recognise and deal with damp, you can resolve a good deal of preventable DIY repair issues.

With this useful advice, you’ll be certain to start expanding your homeowner skill set one step at a time. Before too long, a possible repair will inspire you to action, instead of it feeling like an overwhelming burden.

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Weatherproofing your home: Essential tips for protecting against moisture damage

Weatherproofing your home: Essential tips for protecting against moisture damage

Weatherproofing your home is crucial for maintaining its structural integrity and preventing costly repairs. Moisture damage can lead to a host of problems, including mould growth, wood rot and compromised foundations. By taking proactive measures, you can protect your home from the elements and ensure it remains a safe and comfortable place to live. Here are some essential tips for weatherproofing your home against moisture damage.

Inspect and repair your roof

The roof is your home’s first line of defence against the weather. A well-maintained roof prevents water from entering and causing damage.

Solution:

Regularly inspect your roof for missing or damaged shingles, cracks and signs of wear. Pay special attention to areas around chimneys, vents and skylights. Use Denso flashing tape to seal any potential leak points. This high-quality tape provides a durable, waterproof seal, ensuring your roof remains watertight.

Seal windows and doors

Windows and doors are common entry points for moisture. Ensuring they are properly sealed can prevent water from infiltrating your home.

Solution:

Check the caulking around windows and doors for cracks or gaps, and reapply as needed. Use weatherstripping to seal gaps around doors. For an extra layer of protection, consider using storm windows and doors. Regular maintenance will help keep these seals intact, preventing drafts and leaks.

Maintain gutters and downpipes

Properly functioning gutters and downpipes are essential for directing water away from your home’s foundation. Clogged or damaged gutters can cause water to overflow and seep into your home.

Solution:

Clean your gutters regularly, especially during the fall when leaves can accumulate. Ensure downpipes extend away from your home to direct water flow away from the foundation. Consider installing gutter guards to reduce the frequency of clogs. Inspect and repair any damaged sections to maintain optimal performance.

Protect your foundation

A compromised foundation can lead to serious structural issues and water damage. Keeping water away from your foundation is critical for maintaining your home’s stability.

Solution:

Ensure the ground around your home slopes away from the foundation to promote proper drainage. Install a French drain or a sump pump if you experience persistent water problems. Applying a waterproof sealant to your foundation walls can also provide an extra layer of protection against moisture infiltration.

Insulate and ventilate

Proper insulation and ventilation are key to preventing moisture build-up inside your home. Moisture-laden air can condense on cooler surfaces, leading to mould and mildew growth.

Solution:

Insulate your home to keep indoor temperatures stable and reduce condensation. Ensure your attic, loft and crawl spaces are well-ventilated to allow moisture to escape. Use exhaust fans in bathrooms and kitchens to remove excess humidity. Regularly check for signs of mould and address any issues promptly.

Use Denso Flashing Tape

Denso flashing tape is an excellent product for sealing joints and seams around your home. It’s especially useful for areas prone to leaks, such as roof edges, windows and doors.

Solution:

Apply Denso flashing tape to any joints, seams or gaps where water might enter. Ensure the surface is clean and dry before application. The tape’s strong adhesive and waterproof properties provide a reliable barrier against moisture, enhancing your home’s overall weatherproofing.

Conclusion

Weatherproofing your home is an essential task that protects it from moisture damage and extends its lifespan. By regularly inspecting and maintaining your roof, sealing windows and doors, maintaining gutters and downpipe, protecting your foundation, insulating and ventilating properly and using high-quality products like Denso flashing tape, you can safeguard your home against the elements. Taking these steps not only prevents costly repairs but also ensures a safe, dry and comfortable living environment for you and your family.

Implement these essential weatherproofing tips today to keep your home protected from moisture damage and enjoy peace of mind knowing your investment is well-guarded against the elements.

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