Home-made elderflower curd

Elderflower curd with cup & pot of tea

My beautiful sambucus nigra is still blooming, so I was on the lookout for another recipe in which I could use the flowers. These days, I find so much inspiration on Instagram; one of my Insta-buddies had just posted a photo of some delicious-looking elderflower curd she’d made, so I thought I’d give that a go.

zesting and juicing lemons Elderflower curd ingredients in a saucepan

She used the wild variety of elderflower which has delicate off white flowers however, the flowers on mine are tinged purple. I wondered how that would affect the colour of the resulting curd. I was worried that it would turn out a sludgy brown, but I needn’t have been apprehensive. It had a slight pinkish blush to the usual yellow colour.

This recipe makes a single, average-sized jar, but you can easily multiply the quantities. If you don’t think that you’ll consume all the curd in a week or two, make sure that you thoroughly sterilise all your post-cooking equipment; jars, lids, jelly bag/sieve, spoon/spatula, funnel etc. Simply boil them up in a large jam pan/saucepan of water.

straining elderflower curd through a jelly bag into a measuring jug Elderflower curd in a glass jar

The taste was gorgeous; rich and fragrant. So far, we’ve had it on fruit scones, but it would be perfect in sandwiches, toast or between the layers of a Victoria sponge. This is definitely an elderflower recipe I’ll be returning to every summer.

Click here or on the image below to save this elderflower curd recipe to Pinterest

Home-made elderflower curd recipe

Elderflower curd with cup & pot of tea

Elderflower curd

Cook Time 1 hour
Course Condiment
Cuisine British

Ingredients
  

  • 3 large or 6 small elderflower heads you can use either white or pink flowers
  • 50 g/1¾oz unsalted butter
  • 200 g/7oz white granulated sugar
  • lemons zest & juice
  • 2 eggs

Instructions
 

  • Sterilise a lidded jam jar, jelly bag or sieve, spatula and measuring jug. Set aside for the end
  • Put all the ingredients except the eggs into a saucepan over a low heat. Stir until the butter is melted and the sugar has dissolved
  • Transfer the mixture to a heatproof bowl and allow the contents to cool slightly (about 5 minutes)
  • In the meantime, bring a saucepan of water to a simmer (ensure the heatproof bowl can sit on top of the saucepan without the water coming into contact with the base)
  • Add the eggs to the mixture and put the heatproof bowl on top of the saucepan of simmering water
  • Stir occasionally until the mixture thickens to the consistency of custard (about 45 minutes)
  • Pour the mixture through the sterilised jelly bag/sieve into the measuring jug. Push the contents through using the spatula, if necessary
  • Transfer the curd into the sterilised jar and cover immediately with the lid. Allow to cool completely before using
Elderflower curd ingredients
Keyword curd, elderflower, forage

Price Points: Cast iron griddle stones

Cast iron griddle stones

When the weather is really warm, we’re loath to turn on the wood-fired stove in the kitchen. For hot days like that, we invested in an induction hob. The main difference between an induction hob and a conventional gas/electric/wood-fired hob is the kind of pots & pans you can use on it.

They need to be made of material such as cast iron. Aluminium, glass or stainless steel won’t be suitable. The best way to check is to put a magnet to the base – if it sticks, you’re good to go!

We already had a few well-used & loved graduated cast iron frying pans however, after buying our induction hob, we purchased a set of cream enamel saucepans. To add to our cookery arsenal, I bought a cast iron griddle stone. It’s been great for making Welsh griddle cake, pancakes and this week’s yeasted flat breads.

We’ve listed three cast iron griddle stones below – ours is the example from John Lewis. We also love all the high quality pans manufactured by Netherton foundry in Shropshire. Just imagine cooking on a griddle from the 1800s, think of all the things that were made on it in the preceding 200 years!

  1. Kitchen Craft cast iron baking stone (27cm diameter): £15.40, John Lewis
  2. Black iron 12-inch griddle and baking plate: £75.65, Netherton Foundry
  3. Antique 1800s cast iron skillet/griddle: £160.00, Etsy

shop cast iron griddle stones

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Prices & links correct at time of publication.

Antique 1800s cast iron skillet/griddle
Antique 1800s cast iron skillet/griddle
£160.00
Black iron 12-inch griddle and baking plate
Black iron 12-inch griddle and baking plate
£75.65
Kitchen Craft cast iron baking stone (27cm diameter)
Kitchen Craft cast iron baking stone (27cm diameter)
£15.40
Antique 1800s cast iron skillet/griddle
Antique 1800s cast iron skillet/griddle
£160.00
Black iron 12-inch griddle and baking plate
Black iron 12-inch griddle and baking plate
£75.65
Kitchen Craft cast iron baking stone (27cm diameter)
Kitchen Craft cast iron baking stone (27cm diameter)
£15.40
Antique 1800s cast iron skillet/griddle
Antique 1800s cast iron skillet/griddle
£160.00
Black iron 12-inch griddle and baking plate
Black iron 12-inch griddle and baking plate
£75.65
Kitchen Craft cast iron baking stone (27cm diameter)
Kitchen Craft cast iron baking stone (27cm diameter)
£15.40
Antique 1800s cast iron skillet/griddle
Antique 1800s cast iron skillet/griddle
£160.00
Black iron 12-inch griddle and baking plate
Black iron 12-inch griddle and baking plate
£75.65
Kitchen Craft cast iron baking stone (27cm diameter)
Kitchen Craft cast iron baking stone (27cm diameter)
£15.40
Antique 1800s cast iron skillet/griddle
Antique 1800s cast iron skillet/griddle
£160.00
Black iron 12-inch griddle and baking plate
Black iron 12-inch griddle and baking plate
£75.65
Kitchen Craft cast iron baking stone (27cm diameter)
Kitchen Craft cast iron baking stone (27cm diameter)
£15.40

Cakes & Bakes: Yeasted flat breads

Yeasted flat breads

Because of the continuing hot weather, we’ve still not turned on our oven this week. That doesn’t mean I can’t produce any home-made bread, though. I’ve brought out my trusty cast iron griddle stone once again to make some delicious yeasted flat breads on our induction hob.

Yeast mixture

Many flat breads are yeast-free so can be rustled up in a matter of minutes. However, I had ample time today to spend on making these and waiting an hour or so for the dough to rise.

Ball of yeasted flat bread dough Ball of yeasted flat bread dough

I bought a marble board a few years ago, and I can attest that it’s hard to beat for rolling out dough and pastry with ease.

Portions of yeasted dough

The recipe makes 8 flat breads. If, like us, you don’t need that many at one sitting, you can simply cook, cool and freeze the extra for a later date.

Flipping flat bread on a cast iron griddle stone

These lovely, soft breads are so versatile; they’re perfect as an accompaniment to curry, Mexican fajita wraps or alongside dips such as hummus or baba ganoush.

Click here or on the image below to save this yeasted flat bread recipe to Pinterest

Yeasted flat bread recipe

Yeasted flat breads

Yeasted flat breads

Andy Baraghani
Course Bread
Cuisine Middle Eastern
Servings 8

Ingredients
  

  • tsp sugar
  • 180 ml/6fl oz warm water
  • 7 g/2¼tsp active dry yeast
  • 350 g/12½oz plain or strong bread flour
  • 140 g/5oz full fat plain Greek yoghurt
  • 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tsp fine salt

Instructions
 

  • In a measuring jug, dissolve the sugar in the warm water. Stir in the yeast and allow to sit until foamy (about 10 minutes)
  • In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour and salt. Make a well in the centre and add the yoghurt, olive oil and yeast mixture. Bring together to form a shaggy dough
  • Cover the bowl with a damp tea towel or a reusable elasticated food cover and allow the dough to sit in a warm place until doubled in size (about an hour)
  • Turn the dough out onto a lightly-floured work surface and divide it into 8 equal pieces. Form the pieces into balls and, working with one ball at a time, roll each out into 15cm/6" rounds about ½cm/¼" thick
  • Brush a little olive oil on a large cast iron skillet/griddle stone and bring up to a medium-high heat
  • Working one at a time, cook each flat bread until bubbles appear over the surface (about a minute). Flip and cook until cooked through (about 1 more minute). Continue to cook, turning often, until browned in spots on both sides (about a minute longer)
  • Transfer to a plate and wrap up in a clean kitchen towel to keep warm and soft. Repeat with each of the other balls of dough
yeasted flat bread ingredients
To serve: brush each flat bread with a little olive oil
Keyword bread, flat bread, flatbread, yeasted bread

Cakes & Bakes: Jammy cornmeal griddle cakes

Stack of jammy cornmeal griddle cakes with butter pat on top

This past week or so has been so warm, we’ve not had our wood-fired range cooker running. That means I couldn’t produce an oven-cooked recipe for this week’s Cakes & Bakes post; no cake, no bread. Jammy cornmeal griddle cakes are a delicious brunch dish cooked on a stove top using a griddle stone or cast iron frying pan.

Wet & dry griddle cakes ingredients

Using half cornmeal and half wheat flour gives the pancakes a unique flavour. Buttermilk & bicarb rather than ‘plain’ cow’s milk gives the texture a softness and lightness.

Blackcurrant jam added to griddle cakes mixture Blackcurrant jam swirled into griddle cakes mixture

A little swirl of jam takes the griddle cakes to a different level; we used some home-made blackcurrant jam, but you can use any other to your liking – strawberry, raspberry, apricot, plum… If your jam is a little thick, simply mix it with a couple of teaspoons of water to get a thinner consistency.

Cooking a stack of jammy cornmeal griddle cakes on stovetop

Serve your stack of cornmeal griddle cakes with a knob of butter on top or with extra jam or maple syrup drizzled over.

Click here or on the image below to save the recipe to Pinterest

Jammy cornmeal griddle cakes recipe

Stack of jammy cornmeal griddle cakes with butter pat on top

Jammy cornmeal griddle cakes

Course Breakfast
Servings 4 people

Ingredients
  

  • 100 g/3½oz cornmeal either fine or coarse
  • 100 g/3½oz plain flour
  • 2 tbsp caster sugar
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • pinch of salt
  • 200 ml/7fl oz buttermilk
  • 50 g/1¾oz unsalted butter melted, plus extra for the skillet
  • 2 eggs beaten
  • 2 tbsp jam we used blackcurrant, but feel free to use any other fruit

Instructions
 

  • Preheat your griddle/ large cast iron frying pan over a low heat. Rub a bit of butter all over it
  • In a large measuring jug, combine the cornmeal, flour, sugar, bicarb and salt. Make a well in the centre
  • In a medium measuring jug, pour in the buttermilk. Add the melted butter and stir to combine
  • Pour the buttermilk/butter mixture and beaten egg into the well in the dry ingredients. Use a rubber spatula to bring the mixture together
  • Spoon in the jam and swirl it through a little. Don't over-mix, a few lumps of flour is fine
  • Once the griddle is hot, pour/ladle on approx. 3tbsp/50ml of the mixture into a round shape. Allow the griddle cake to cook for a couple of minutes. When bubbles begin to form and the top begins to dry out around the edges towards the middle, flip over and cook the other side for another minute. Repeat until all the batter is used
jammy cornmeal griddle cakes ingredients
Serve with extra jam, a pat of butter or maple syrup
Keyword cornmeal, griddle cakes