5 ways to incorporate Greek design into your home

5 ways to incorporate Greek design into your home

Liven up your home with a fresh Mediterranean makeover. With these simple changes, you can transform your surroundings from drab and cold to warm, exotic and inviting. Greek design and décor has a rich, timeless history and its delightful aesthetic will leave you thinking you’re on a permanent vacation.

Sheer fabrics

The warm and constant sunshine is a staple of Greek life. Mediterranean homes are commonly fitted with large windows and skylights that allow in that radiant warmth. Sheer fabrics are ideal for curtains; with their thin, light texture and uncluttered design. Silk, linen and muslin are especially suitable for this. Look for delicate designs and muted colours. Alternatively, you could try having no curtains, instead using indoor shutters to let in or block out the sun and incorporate sheer fabrics into other soft furnishings.

Columns

Tall, thin columns are a huge part of Greek design and architecture. While you may not need columns to prop up your house, they can still be incorporated into your interior design. Columns are ideal for patios and porches or decorating fireplaces and doorways. These impressive features could be found throughout the Ancient Greek world, as well as the realm of the Gods. To immerse yourself into this ancient Greek theme, you can try the gates of olympus slot and witness the wonders of Ancient Greece first hand and use this as inspiration to spruce up your home.

Olive trees and olive oils

Olives have always been a massive part of Greek culture, economy and cuisine. Beautiful olive trees can be found throughout Greek homes – inside and outdoors. The very sight of an olive tree is enough to evoke a warm, Mediterranean feel. Olive trees are easy to find and simple to grow indoors. Similarly, olive oil is commonly found in Greek food, and it’s often used to preserve staple foods. Fill your kitchen with various high-quality olive oils in sleek glass bottles to enhance your aesthetics and cooking.

Damask

Damask fabrics feature vibrant designs and warm colours. They’re commonly used as bedding since they’re generally considered too heavy to be used as curtains. Although damask originated in Byzantium, it was commonplace in the homes of Ancient Greeks, who loved the style. Damask is created by a unique process of weaving a weft yarn and warp yarn together, often using satin yarn. They’re typically found in two-colour patterns, such as blue and white.

Wooden furniture

Greek homes often use natural materials like wood – especially olive wood – for their furniture and décor. Tables, chairs and beds can all be made from wood and are generally quite simple. Although they sometimes feature intricately carved patterns, they’re often straightforward and understated. White furnishings are also typical in Greek homes. Whether you settle on a handmade, distressed or vintage style, wooden furniture is a great way to give your home a Mediterranean feel.

Conclusion

These simple and exciting changes can make a huge difference in your home. Spruce up your daily living and warm up your surroundings with these Greek aesthetics. Let in the sun, raise those columns and have your friends jealous of your home-made Mediterranean paradise.

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How pets affect your household: A guide

How pets affect your household: A guide

Getting a pet can be great, but it isn’t something you should rush into without giving a lot of prior thought. Many people assume that owning a pet is easy and that it won’t affect their day-to-day lives in any significant way, but that simply isn’t true. The reality is that owning a pet will affect your household in many ways, and many of them can be negative.

Of course, this doesn’t mean you shouldn’t get a pet, as there are many positives to it as well, but it does mean that you should be aware of what you’re getting yourself into before taking the plunge.

Pets can smell unpleasant

Most types of pets can smell unpleasant at times. And yes, that includes low-maintenance pets like fish and birds, especially if you don’t clean their fish bowls or cages regularly.

Dogs and cats can also sometimes have a foul odour. At times, this simply means that they need a bath, but it can also be that their hormones or other factors are causing them to smell whiffy. And of course, if they have an accident in the house, especially on a rug or carpet, that scent can linger. However, don’t let this scare you off from having a pet, as there are companies that specialise in pet odor removal.

Pets can destroy your belongings

Dogs and cats can scratch and chew your belongings until they’re damaged beyond repair. Even if you take steps to avoid this, there’s still the chance that your pet may destroy a few items here & there, especially if they’re still young.

Bear in mind that this doesn’t just refer to small, easily replaceable items like shoes, but also larger or more valuable belongings. For example, your pet could chew on the legs of your sofa, or they could damage your screen door.

Pets can shed

Pets also shed, which means that if you own a dog or a cat, the odds are that you, your furniture and your home’s floor will always be covered in dog or cat fur.

If this is something that will bother you, or if you have severe allergies, it may be best to opt for another type of pet, such as a fish or hamster. However, if you have your heart set on a dog or cat, there are ways to cope with the shedding. You can get a breed of dog that doesn’t shed, or you could invest in gadgets that easily remove pet hair from your clothes.

Pets fill your house with love

Of course, since we’ve spent the whole post so far talking about a few negative ways that a pet can affect your household, you may be wondering why so many people still have pets, or why you should still consider getting one.

Simply put, despite all the cons that may come with owning a pet, there are also many pros – with the biggest one being that a pet is bound to fill your house with love. If you have kids, you should also consider getting a pet for their benefit, as pets can have a positive influence on children. You can learn more about that here.

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How to furnish your living room the right way

How to furnish your living room the right way

Living rooms are spaces that should be inviting and comfortable for all who enter them. They’re a place to relax and spend time with family and friends. Therefore, when you furnish your living room, it’s essential to keep in mind the different activities that will take place there. In addition, you want to create a space that’s both functional and stylish.

#1 Begin by assessing the space with which you have to work

The first step to furnishing your living room is to take accurate space measurements. This will give you a better idea of what furniture pieces will fit and where they can be placed. It’s also essential to consider doorways, windows and any other obstacles that may limit your furniture choices. Once you have your measurements, you can start planning the layout of your room.

You may want to create separate areas for different activities if you have a large living room. For example, you could have a seating area for watching TV and a separate conversation area with comfortable chairs and a coffee table. If your living room is on the smaller side, you’ll want to choose versatile furniture that can be used for multiple purposes. Ottomans with storage, for example, can be used as both a place to put your feet up and as extra seating when guests come over.

Another important consideration when assessing your space is the traffic flow. You’ll want to leave enough room for people to move around comfortably without having to move furniture out of the way. Creating a clear path from the door to the main seating area is usually a good idea. You also want to avoid putting furniture too close to windows, as the sunlight can damage upholstery over time.

#2 Choose a focal point

After you have a good idea of the layout of your living room, it’s time to start thinking about what you want to use as a focal point. This could be anything from a fireplace to a large window or even a piece of artwork. Once you have chosen your focal point, everything else in the room should be arranged around it.

For example, if you have a fireplace, you might want to arrange your furniture so that everyone is facing it. If you have a large window, you might want to put your sofa in front of it to enjoy the view. Whatever you choose as your focal point, ensure that the rest of the room is arranged in a way that makes sense and looks good.

Choosing a focal point is a great way to make your living room look and feel more cohesive and put together. It will also help you to figure out the best way to arrange your furniture and make the most of your space.

#3 Select the right furniture

After you have chosen your focal point and planned the layout of your room, it’s time to start picking out furniture. The type of furniture you select will depend on the overall style of your living room. Opt for classic pieces such as a Chesterfield sofa or an upholstered armchair if you want a more traditional look. Try a sleek leather curved sofa or a glass coffee table for a more contemporary space.

When selecting furniture, keep in mind both form and function are essential. Make sure that the pieces you choose are not only stylish but also comfortable and practical. For example, if you have young children, choosing a white sofa that’s easily stained might not be wise. Likewise, if you often entertain, ensure enough seating for everyone.

#4 Add the final touches

After you have everything in place and arranged the way you want it, it is now time to add the final touches. This would include items such as throw pillows, blankets, candles, and anything else that you feel would make your living room complete. Again, take your time with this step, and don’t rush it. You want your living room to be a space that you love and feel comfortable in.

Take some time to browse through home décor magazines or even Pinterest for inspiration. There are endless possibilities when it comes to adding the final touches to your living room. Just have fun with it and let your personality shine through!

Furnishing your living room doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive. Take your time, plan ahead, and choose pieces you love. With a little effort, you can easily create a space that you and your family will enjoy for years to come.

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Get their look: Memphis-inspired artist’s home

Memphis-inspired artist's home in Manchester city centre

We often choose an artist’s residence as our weekly featured Get their look home. Today, it’s a Memphis-inspired, new-build, city centre flat; a little bit of Italy in the middle of Manchester.

On his Instagram feed, Michael Pybus titles his home like he would a work of modern art; Home (Living room, kitchen, studio, hallway) 2022 – 61m² / 656ft².

His living space is a seamless meld of high-end, vintage Italian design and classic IKEA with a backdrop of primary colours.

Pybus explains his taste in a recent Apartment Therapy interview:

My style is quite plasticky, hard edged and artificial but I also do really appreciate nature and natural forms which is what drew me to setting up and growing a mini coral reef.

Get their look

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Virgil Abloh x IKEA MARKERAD Receipt rug
Virgil Abloh x IKEA MARKERAD Receipt rug
Lilac retro microwave
Lilac retro microwave
Tahiti table lamp by Ettore Sottsass in 1981 for Memphis Milano
Tahiti table lamp by Ettore Sottsass in 1981 for Memphis Milano
Svarva floor lamp designed in 2009 by Front Designers for IKEA
Svarva floor lamp designed in 2009 by Front Designers for IKEA
Orbital floor lamp by Ferruccio Laviani in 1992 for Foscarini
Orbital floor lamp by Ferruccio Laviani in 1992 for Foscarini
Oceanic lamp by Michele de Lucchi designed in 1981 for Memphis Milano
Oceanic lamp by Michele de Lucchi designed in 1981 for Memphis Milano
Red and Blue chair by Gerrit T. Rietveld designed in 1918 for Cassina
Red and Blue chair by Gerrit T. Rietveld designed in 1918 for Cassina
Virgil Abloh x IKEA MARKERAD Receipt rug
Virgil Abloh x IKEA MARKERAD Receipt rug
Lilac retro microwave
Lilac retro microwave
Tahiti table lamp by Ettore Sottsass in 1981 for Memphis Milano
Tahiti table lamp by Ettore Sottsass in 1981 for Memphis Milano
Svarva floor lamp designed in 2009 by Front Designers for IKEA
Svarva floor lamp designed in 2009 by Front Designers for IKEA
Orbital floor lamp by Ferruccio Laviani in 1992 for Foscarini
Orbital floor lamp by Ferruccio Laviani in 1992 for Foscarini
Oceanic lamp by Michele de Lucchi designed in 1981 for Memphis Milano
Oceanic lamp by Michele de Lucchi designed in 1981 for Memphis Milano
Red and Blue chair by Gerrit T. Rietveld designed in 1918 for Cassina
Red and Blue chair by Gerrit T. Rietveld designed in 1918 for Cassina