7 things to check before taking possession of your new home

7 things to check before taking possession of your new home

You’ve finally found your perfect house and now it’s time to sign on the dotted line. Congratulations! But there’s still a lot of work left to do before you can call your new home officially yours. You wouldn’t like to be sitting in your new home without a great deal of focus and attention to detail, now would you? If you don’t take care of the small things, your new home could end up costing you much more in the long term. Here are the 7 most important things to check on before taking possession of your new home.

Drainage

A landscaping survey is important to assess if the original drainage system is adequate enough to support your new home. Your water drainage system should help divert rainwater from inside your home, into the soil and away from the foundation. You can get services of drain survey in London to conduct a survey in your planned house. By using CCTV, a surveyor can go through all the nooks and corners of your new home. This is to ensure that there are no blocked sewage pipes, water drainage systems or sewer lines that may be causing flooding problems.

Windows and doors

Before moving into a new home, you should consider checking the condition of all windows and doors. You wouldn’t want your home to be flooded or have small holes in the roof while you are waiting on a repairman to arrive. You should make sure that the window openers are in good condition, as well as locks and weather strips. With these items in bad condition, a burglar can simply break into your house, or the window could easily be blown open.

Appliances

You should make sure that all the appliances, including your heating system and air conditioner, are in good working order. Your heating system should be equipped with the necessary tools to help you control its functioning. You should be in a position to know when you need to replace the filters, as well as the temperature setting and heating zones. Your cooling system should have enough ventilation to adequately cool your house while maintaining a low noise level.

Utilities

Before you move into your new home, make sure that there are no leaks in your water, gas or electrical connections. You should be checking for leaks by putting food colouring into your plumbing system. Wait a few hours to see if the water has coloured. If it has, then the lines are leaking. Do not move into your new home without a repairman to check. By having a routine check, you will be able to notice any leaks and also make repairs before any damage occurs to your house.

Paintwork

You should make sure that the paint on the walls of your new home is in good condition before moving into it. If there’s cracked and flaking paint, then you should have it repaired as soon as possible. There are many techniques to paint walls. Inspect the paint on your external walls and check for visible cracks and flaking.

Flooring

The condition of the floor of your new home is critical to the long-term maintenance, in addition to its value. You should inspect the floors and joists in your new home for any defects or rot. You should also check for loose boards and protruding nails that will need to be remedied. In addition, you should use a moisture meter to detect any areas of damp.

Roof

While you’re conducting your inspection, you should check your roof for any damaged and loose tiles or slates. The roof, in addition to the walls, is a major element of the visual appeal of your home. As well as the slates, inspect the rafters, joists and fascias – especially if it’s an old building. Furthermore, look out for signs of termite infestation such as holes or nests.

By checking all these details before moving into your new home, you’ll ensure that your new home is in good condition. You’ll cut down the overall expenses of maintaining it and reduce the risk of any unexpected repair jobs. The most important thing is that, when you’re taking possession of your new home, you don’t get caught out by unforeseen costs.

[disclosure*]

Designer Desire: George Westren

Montage of George Westren op art prints

This week, we read a fascinating and, at the same time, sad story on the Guardian website about the virtually unknown op artist, George Westren.

Apparently, he died in 2021 and his housing association home was recently being cleared out. A mere week ago (20th June 2022), near neighbour, Alan Warburton, happened to see all his artworks being dumped in a skip by the removal company. Luckily, Alan managed to retrieve his portfolio; alas, not all of the artworks.

Alan didn’t know George all that well in life, but after rescuing some of his work, he embarked on a mission to find out more about him. Thanks to a Twitter post that went viral, George Westren has gained global recognition. Friends and family have been contacted and they have shared their information and stories.

The artworks in the portfolio have been made into prints and are now available to purchase. Prices range from £70 to £100. Proceeds will be going towards mounting an exhibition of George’s work and securing its preservation and safe storage.

Portrait of George Westrencredit

Geometric lines kept me on the straight and narrow

All other images: © George Westren

Price Points: Portable extractors

Portable extractors

Each of the three portable extractors that we’re highlighting today have their own YouTube videos to make their case; we’ve embedded them below.

Like us, many people don’t have a built-in extractor fan above their cookers. It’s probably not too much of a problem if you have an external window in your kitchen that you can open while you’re cooking smelly, smoky or oily foods. Also, if you have an open plan kitchen/diner and sitting room – you don’t always want cooking smells spreading and lingering. It would be even worse if you live in a studio where your bedroom is included in the open living space. The smell of food would get into your bedding and clothes – not ideal!

My choice would be the AirHood – it’s the cheapest option, beautifully designed and, after a successful fundraising campaign, will be shipping internationally from November 2022.

1. AirHood™: from £81.00, Indiegogo

2. Mobile dual-filter range hood 4600+3 packs of refill packs: £115.75, pinkoi

3. Dyson Purifier HEPA Cool™ Formaldehyde purifying fan: £549.99, Dyson

shop portable extractors

Some of the links on our blog are affiliate links. We may receive a small commission - at no cost to you - if you click through and make a purchase.

Dyson Purifier HEPA Cool™ Formaldehyde purifying fan
Dyson Purifier HEPA Cool™ Formaldehyde purifying fan
£549.99
Mobile dual-filter range hood 4600+3 packs of refill packs
Mobile dual-filter range hood 4600+3 packs of refill packs
£115.75
AirHood™
AirHood™
from £81.00
Dyson Purifier HEPA Cool™ Formaldehyde purifying fan
Dyson Purifier HEPA Cool™ Formaldehyde purifying fan
£549.99
Mobile dual-filter range hood 4600+3 packs of refill packs
Mobile dual-filter range hood 4600+3 packs of refill packs
£115.75
AirHood™
AirHood™
from £81.00
Dyson Purifier HEPA Cool™ Formaldehyde purifying fan
Dyson Purifier HEPA Cool™ Formaldehyde purifying fan
£549.99
Mobile dual-filter range hood 4600+3 packs of refill packs
Mobile dual-filter range hood 4600+3 packs of refill packs
£115.75
AirHood™
AirHood™
from £81.00
Dyson Purifier HEPA Cool™ Formaldehyde purifying fan
Dyson Purifier HEPA Cool™ Formaldehyde purifying fan
£549.99
Mobile dual-filter range hood 4600+3 packs of refill packs
Mobile dual-filter range hood 4600+3 packs of refill packs
£115.75
AirHood™
AirHood™
from £81.00
Dyson Purifier HEPA Cool™ Formaldehyde purifying fan
Dyson Purifier HEPA Cool™ Formaldehyde purifying fan
£549.99
Mobile dual-filter range hood 4600+3 packs of refill packs
Mobile dual-filter range hood 4600+3 packs of refill packs
£115.75
AirHood™
AirHood™
from £81.00

Auction alert: Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood – The Summer Sale

A set of five large 19th century green glass pharmacy bottles/carboys

1,711 lots will be coming under the hammer at The Summer Sale of Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood. The 3-day auction, being held in Exeter, begins on Wednesday 13th July 2022 from 10am.

The order of sale is as follows:

  • Day 1: Wednesday 13th July 2022, 10am (starting at lot 551)
  • Day 2: Thursday 14th July 2022, 10am (starting at lot 1351)
  • Day 3: Friday 15th July 2022, 10am (starting at lot 1721)

Below, we’ve selected a few lots from the sale that we like and we think you will too. Click here to view the entire sale catalogue.

There’ll be a buyer’s premium of 25% + VAT (30%) on the final hammer price. An additional surcharge of £3.00 or 3% will be made if you plan on bidding via EasyLiveAuction.

We do not undertake postage and packing or recommend anyone who may undertake this on your behalf. However the local branch of Mailboxes who receive our catalogues and are happy to assist and will quote in advance.

A George V silver framed perpetual calendar

Lot 784: A George V silver framed perpetual calendar
Maker John Collard Vikery, London, 1926: of rectangular outline, 25 x 20.5cm.
Estimate: £100 – £150

A set of five large 19th century green glass pharmacy bottles/carboys

Lot 1370: A set of five large 19th century green glass pharmacy bottles/carboys
Decorated in red and gilt with eagles and inscribed labels for Tr: Gent: Comp/ Lavender:S/Tr:Camph:Co/Tr Myrrh:Ae/Tr:Rhell:Co; 32-35cm.
Estimate: £1,2o0 – £1,800

A Victorian petit point sampler

Lot 1722: A Victorian petit point sampler
A Victorian petit point sampler: with religious verse, view of a rural cottage, a crown, harps, birds, flowering shrubs, animals and a boy seated on the back of a dog, enclosed by a floral meander border, worked in coloured silks of browns, greens blues and cream by Isabel Hickling, aged 12 and dated 1841, framed and glazed, 42 x 33cm.
Estimate: £200 – £300

A 19th century mahogany and brass bound peat bucket

Lot 1748: A 19th century mahogany and brass bound peat bucket
Of coopered construction, with brass loop carrying handle, 48cm high (handle up).
Estimate: £60 – £100

A pair of Rajasthan beaten copper water jars

Lot 1820: A pair of Rajasthan beaten copper water jars
Of ovoid form with flared rims, on flattened bases, 39cm diameter.
Estimate: £150 – £250

A collection of 18th century and later pewter plates and bowls

Lot 1903: A collection of 18th century and later pewter plates and bowls
Includes continental examples, diameters range from, 23.5cm to 20cm. (a lot).
Estimate: £60 – £100

A collection of five large copper cooking pots

Lot 1922: A collection of five large copper cooking pots
One stamped Savoy Hotel, of cylindrical outline with loop metal carrying handles, 30cm high, together with a similar smaller pot and a pan.
Estimate: £200 – £300

A pair of leaded glazed centre-light globe shades

Lot 1934: A pair of leaded glazed centre-light globe shades
Inset with clear and coloured glass panels with suspension chains, 28cm high (2).
Estimate: £80 – £120

Jaeger-LeCoultre a skeletonised mantel clock

Lot 1965: Jaeger-LeCoultre a skeletonised mantel clock
The eight-day duration in-line skeletonised jewelled movement having a lever escapement, the lucite and brass case with gilt brass hands and faceted hour markings, the base stamped 354, contained in a box marked for Jaeger-leCoultre, and numbered 354, height 16cm.
Estimate: £500 – £600

Two terracotta garden pots

Lot 2353: Two terracotta garden pots
Second half 20th century,: both of ovoid form with ribbed exterior; the larger example with three loop handles; 81 and 70cm high respectively.
Of ovoid form with flared rims, on flattened bases, 39cm diameter.
Estimate: £120 – £180