Cakes & Bakes: 24-hour sourdough loaf

Home-made 24-hour sourdough loaf | H is for Home #baking #sourdough #sourdoughbread #realbread #recipe

Someone over on our Instagram feed asked when I was going to share the recipe for the 24-hour sourdough loaf that I’d photographed. I forgot that I’d never actually blogged about it, so here it is!

Bubbling sourdough starter | H is for Home

It’s my new favourite sourdough bread recipe because it helps me plan my baking time to a tee. No more hanging around at bedtime for my bread to be ready to take out of the oven. You start at “zero hour” with a refresh of the starter and end with taking it out of the oven.

La Cloche baking dome | H is for Home

The 24 hour duration is a fairly loose timing. You can stretch or shorten the time line to suit by warming or cooling the environment of the starter and the rising dough. I like to time it so that my final prove takes place overnight. The recipe suggests refrigerating the dough for this 8-12 hour stage however, our downstairs cloakroom gets really cold at night – and the banneton takes up a lot of space – so I do the rise in there.

Sliced, home-made 24-hour sourdough loaf | H is for Home

It means I can get up in the morning, pre-heat the oven and La Cloche and enjoy lovely, fresh sourdough for breakfast!

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24-hour sourdough loaf
Yields 1
Ingredients
  1. 585ml/20½fl oz water at 27ºC
  2. 180g/6⅓oz 1:1 (100% hydrated) fresh sourdough starter that's been refreshed the night before and again in the morning (Hour 0)
  3. 900g/31¾oz strong white bread flour
  4. 9g/⅓oz fine sea salt
  5. a little rice flour for dusting your banneton (I can't recommend this enough!!)
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Hour 6
  1. In a bowl, whisk the warm water and starter and mix well
  2. Add the flour and salt (combined well) and mix until all the ingredients come together into a large ball
  3. Cover with cling film and let the dough rest in a cool environment for 1½ hours
Hour 8½
  1. Lift and fold your dough over, do a quarter turn of your bowl and repeat three more times. Repeat hourly 3 more times
Hour 12½
  1. Shape your dough lightly and place into a dusted banneton
  2. Cover with a shower cap or damp tea-towel and leave to prove on the side until the dough has risen by about 50%. This normally takes about 2 hours in a kitchen that is about 18-20 degrees, then transfer to the fridge for 8-12 hours
Hour 24
  1. In the morning, preheat the oven to 220ºC for 30 minutes to 1 hour before you are ready to bake with your La Cloche in the oven. The dish or La Cloche must be very hot
  2. Take the dish out of the oven and sprinkle a little flour over the bottom
  3. Put your dough into the La Cloche and slash the top of your bread using a grignette (or lame) then place the lid back on top and return to the oven as quickly as possible. Bake for 45 minutes
  4. Turn the heat down to 190ºC, remove the lid and bake for another 15-20 minutes
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